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Socio-economic influences on gender inequalities in child health in rural Bangladesh.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996 Aug; 50(8):560-4.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate gender inequalities in child growth and nutritional status in relation to socio-economic status in Bangladesh.

DESIGN

A 16-month longitudinal study of child growth measuring anthropometric and socio-economic status.

SETTING

A rural area of Jamalpur district, northern Bangladesh.

SUBJECTS

1366 children from 2 to 6 years of age.

METHODS

Child height and weight were measured monthly. Morbidity, food intake and health-seeking behaviours were assessed fortnightly. Multivariable analyses were performed on the growth and nutritional status of male and female children in relation to socio-economic factors including father's occupation, parental education, birth order and family size.

RESULTS

There was no evidence of gender bias in farming and trading/employee households but landless female children had significantly poorer height-for-age (P < 0.001) and weight-for-age (P < 0.001) than their male counterparts. During a period of natural disaster, a statistically significant interaction was observed between father's occupation and sex (P < 0.05) such that the combination of being female and being landless was more detrimental to nutritional status than either variable alone. Over the following 16-months, catch-up-growth was apparent in landless female children who grew significantly more in height-for-age (P < 0.001) and weight-for-age (P < 0.001) than their male counterparts.

CONCLUSIONS

Gender inequalities in health in Bangladesh varied significantly according to occupational status, such that the effect of sex was dependent upon occupation. These effects were statistically significant during the period of natural disaster but became insignificant as local conditions improved. This demonstrates both temporal and socio-economic variation in gender inequalities in health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anatomy and Human Biology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Perth, Western Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8863018

Citation

Rousham, E K.. "Socio-economic Influences On Gender Inequalities in Child Health in Rural Bangladesh." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 50, no. 8, 1996, pp. 560-4.
Rousham EK. Socio-economic influences on gender inequalities in child health in rural Bangladesh. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996;50(8):560-4.
Rousham, E. K. (1996). Socio-economic influences on gender inequalities in child health in rural Bangladesh. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 50(8), 560-4.
Rousham EK. Socio-economic Influences On Gender Inequalities in Child Health in Rural Bangladesh. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996;50(8):560-4. PubMed PMID: 8863018.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Socio-economic influences on gender inequalities in child health in rural Bangladesh. A1 - Rousham,E K, PY - 1996/8/1/pubmed PY - 1996/8/1/medline PY - 1996/8/1/entrez KW - Age Factors KW - Asia KW - Bangladesh KW - Biology KW - Child KW - Child Development KW - Comparative Studies KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Economic Factors KW - Employment Status KW - Environment KW - Growth KW - Health KW - Inequalities KW - Malnutrition KW - Natural Disaster KW - Nutrition KW - Nutrition Disorders KW - Nutrition Surveys KW - Occupational Status KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Research Methodology KW - Sex Discrimination KW - Sex Factors KW - Social Discrimination KW - Social Problems KW - Socioeconomic Factors KW - Socioeconomic Status KW - Southern Asia KW - Studies KW - Youth SP - 560 EP - 4 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 50 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate gender inequalities in child growth and nutritional status in relation to socio-economic status in Bangladesh. DESIGN: A 16-month longitudinal study of child growth measuring anthropometric and socio-economic status. SETTING: A rural area of Jamalpur district, northern Bangladesh. SUBJECTS: 1366 children from 2 to 6 years of age. METHODS: Child height and weight were measured monthly. Morbidity, food intake and health-seeking behaviours were assessed fortnightly. Multivariable analyses were performed on the growth and nutritional status of male and female children in relation to socio-economic factors including father's occupation, parental education, birth order and family size. RESULTS: There was no evidence of gender bias in farming and trading/employee households but landless female children had significantly poorer height-for-age (P < 0.001) and weight-for-age (P < 0.001) than their male counterparts. During a period of natural disaster, a statistically significant interaction was observed between father's occupation and sex (P < 0.05) such that the combination of being female and being landless was more detrimental to nutritional status than either variable alone. Over the following 16-months, catch-up-growth was apparent in landless female children who grew significantly more in height-for-age (P < 0.001) and weight-for-age (P < 0.001) than their male counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: Gender inequalities in health in Bangladesh varied significantly according to occupational status, such that the effect of sex was dependent upon occupation. These effects were statistically significant during the period of natural disaster but became insignificant as local conditions improved. This demonstrates both temporal and socio-economic variation in gender inequalities in health. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8863018/Socio_economic_influences_on_gender_inequalities_in_child_health_in_rural_Bangladesh_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -