Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Microbiology and management of sinusitis.
J Otolaryngol. 1996 Aug; 25(4):249-56.JO

Abstract

PURPOSE

The pathophysiology, microbiology, and treatment of acute and chronic sinusitis are reviewed.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

The current literature is reviewed.

REVIEW

Sinusitis generally develops as a complication of viral or allergic inflammation of the upper respiratory tract. Bacterial pathogens contribute to the inflammatory process-Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis are predominant in acute sinusitis, while anaerobic bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus are predominant in chronic sinusitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as a potential pathogen in the immunocompromised patients and in those who have nasal tubes or catheters. Many of these organisms recovered from sinusitis became resistant to penicillins either through the production of beta-lactamase (H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, S. aureus, Fusobacterium sp., and Prevotella sp.) or through changes in the penicillin-binding protein (S. pneumoniae). The pathogenicity of beta-lactamase-producing bacteria is expressed directly through their ability to cause infections, and indirectly through the production of beta-lactamase.

CONCLUSIONS

The indirect pathogenicity is conveyed not only by surviving penicillin therapy, but also by "shielding" penicillin-susceptible pathogens from the drug. The direct and indirect virulent characteristics of these bacteria require the administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy directed against all pathogens in mixed infections. Proper therapy, with antimicrobial and decongestants combined when indicated with surgical drainage and correction of pathology, constitutes the cornerstone of management of sinusitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8863213

Citation

Brook, I. "Microbiology and Management of Sinusitis." The Journal of Otolaryngology, vol. 25, no. 4, 1996, pp. 249-56.
Brook I. Microbiology and management of sinusitis. J Otolaryngol. 1996;25(4):249-56.
Brook, I. (1996). Microbiology and management of sinusitis. The Journal of Otolaryngology, 25(4), 249-56.
Brook I. Microbiology and Management of Sinusitis. J Otolaryngol. 1996;25(4):249-56. PubMed PMID: 8863213.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microbiology and management of sinusitis. A1 - Brook,I, PY - 1996/8/1/pubmed PY - 1996/8/1/medline PY - 1996/8/1/entrez SP - 249 EP - 56 JF - The Journal of otolaryngology JO - J Otolaryngol VL - 25 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: The pathophysiology, microbiology, and treatment of acute and chronic sinusitis are reviewed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The current literature is reviewed. REVIEW: Sinusitis generally develops as a complication of viral or allergic inflammation of the upper respiratory tract. Bacterial pathogens contribute to the inflammatory process-Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis are predominant in acute sinusitis, while anaerobic bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus are predominant in chronic sinusitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa has emerged as a potential pathogen in the immunocompromised patients and in those who have nasal tubes or catheters. Many of these organisms recovered from sinusitis became resistant to penicillins either through the production of beta-lactamase (H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, S. aureus, Fusobacterium sp., and Prevotella sp.) or through changes in the penicillin-binding protein (S. pneumoniae). The pathogenicity of beta-lactamase-producing bacteria is expressed directly through their ability to cause infections, and indirectly through the production of beta-lactamase. CONCLUSIONS: The indirect pathogenicity is conveyed not only by surviving penicillin therapy, but also by "shielding" penicillin-susceptible pathogens from the drug. The direct and indirect virulent characteristics of these bacteria require the administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy directed against all pathogens in mixed infections. Proper therapy, with antimicrobial and decongestants combined when indicated with surgical drainage and correction of pathology, constitutes the cornerstone of management of sinusitis. SN - 0381-6605 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8863213/Microbiology_and_management_of_sinusitis_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -