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Properties of azithromycin that enhance the potential for compliance in children with upper respiratory tract infections.
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1996 Sep; 15(9 Suppl):S30-7.PI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Azithromycin, the prototypical azalide antibiotic, has a wide spectrum of activity that is characterized by resistance to beta-lactamase-producing microbes and efficacy against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including Haemophilus influenzae. Tissue-directed pharmacokinetics include tissue concentrations up to 100-fold higher than those in plasma and a tissue half-life of up to 4 days. Pharmacokinetics of azithromycin permits a reduction in dosage frequency and duration while maintaining efficacy comparable to that of conventional 7- to 10-day three or four times daily regimens. Dosage interval, duration of treatment, side effects and palatability can affect compliance and thus clinical outcome. Compliance among children is important in light of the high incidence of community-acquired infections such as otitis media and streptococcal pharyngitis.

OBJECTIVE

To compare the flavor, taste acceptability and color preference of oral antibiotic suspensions given to children.

METHODS

The taste and acceptability of the oral suspension form of azithromycin vs. cefixime, cefpodoxime proxetil, cefprozil, clarithromycin or loracarbef were rated by children during blinded taste tests and with acceptability/ preference questionnaires.

RESULTS

Analysis of the mean acceptability/ preference rating from 769 children demonstrated that the flavor of azithromycin was rated significantly higher than that of cefpodoxime (4.3 vs. 2.8), cefprozil (4.0 vs. 3.4) and clarithromycin (4.3 vs. 2.7) and was comparable to that of cefixime (4.0 vs. 4.2) and loracarbef (4.4 vs. 4.5). A greater percentage of children preferred the taste of azithromycin to that of cefpodoxime (90.0% vs. 5.2%), cefprozil (63.0% vs. 33.1%) and clarithromycin (89.0% vs. 11.0%). The taste of azithromycin was not preferred to that of cefixime (39.0% vs. 53.9%) or loracarbef (36% vs. 58.5%).

CONCLUSIONS

The efficacy and safety of azithromycin in otitis media and streptococcal pharyngitis, the simple dosing regimen and a highly palatable oral suspension formulation should increase compliance among pediatric patients and thereby improve clinical outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hill Top Research, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8878244

Citation

Powers, J L.. "Properties of Azithromycin That Enhance the Potential for Compliance in Children With Upper Respiratory Tract Infections." The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 15, no. 9 Suppl, 1996, pp. S30-7.
Powers JL. Properties of azithromycin that enhance the potential for compliance in children with upper respiratory tract infections. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1996;15(9 Suppl):S30-7.
Powers, J. L. (1996). Properties of azithromycin that enhance the potential for compliance in children with upper respiratory tract infections. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 15(9 Suppl), S30-7.
Powers JL. Properties of Azithromycin That Enhance the Potential for Compliance in Children With Upper Respiratory Tract Infections. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1996;15(9 Suppl):S30-7. PubMed PMID: 8878244.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Properties of azithromycin that enhance the potential for compliance in children with upper respiratory tract infections. A1 - Powers,J L, PY - 1996/9/1/pubmed PY - 1996/9/1/medline PY - 1996/9/1/entrez SP - S30 EP - 7 JF - The Pediatric infectious disease journal JO - Pediatr Infect Dis J VL - 15 IS - 9 Suppl N2 - BACKGROUND: Azithromycin, the prototypical azalide antibiotic, has a wide spectrum of activity that is characterized by resistance to beta-lactamase-producing microbes and efficacy against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including Haemophilus influenzae. Tissue-directed pharmacokinetics include tissue concentrations up to 100-fold higher than those in plasma and a tissue half-life of up to 4 days. Pharmacokinetics of azithromycin permits a reduction in dosage frequency and duration while maintaining efficacy comparable to that of conventional 7- to 10-day three or four times daily regimens. Dosage interval, duration of treatment, side effects and palatability can affect compliance and thus clinical outcome. Compliance among children is important in light of the high incidence of community-acquired infections such as otitis media and streptococcal pharyngitis. OBJECTIVE: To compare the flavor, taste acceptability and color preference of oral antibiotic suspensions given to children. METHODS: The taste and acceptability of the oral suspension form of azithromycin vs. cefixime, cefpodoxime proxetil, cefprozil, clarithromycin or loracarbef were rated by children during blinded taste tests and with acceptability/ preference questionnaires. RESULTS: Analysis of the mean acceptability/ preference rating from 769 children demonstrated that the flavor of azithromycin was rated significantly higher than that of cefpodoxime (4.3 vs. 2.8), cefprozil (4.0 vs. 3.4) and clarithromycin (4.3 vs. 2.7) and was comparable to that of cefixime (4.0 vs. 4.2) and loracarbef (4.4 vs. 4.5). A greater percentage of children preferred the taste of azithromycin to that of cefpodoxime (90.0% vs. 5.2%), cefprozil (63.0% vs. 33.1%) and clarithromycin (89.0% vs. 11.0%). The taste of azithromycin was not preferred to that of cefixime (39.0% vs. 53.9%) or loracarbef (36% vs. 58.5%). CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy and safety of azithromycin in otitis media and streptococcal pharyngitis, the simple dosing regimen and a highly palatable oral suspension formulation should increase compliance among pediatric patients and thereby improve clinical outcomes. SN - 0891-3668 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8878244/Properties_of_azithromycin_that_enhance_the_potential_for_compliance_in_children_with_upper_respiratory_tract_infections_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/00006454-199609009-00006 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -