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Postprandial triacylglycerolaemia: the effect of low-fat dietary treatment with and without fish oil supplementation.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996 Sep; 50(9):617-24.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

This study investigated whether a low-dose of fish oil had the ability to prevent the adverse effects associated with low-fat dietary treatment, namely elevated plasma triacylglycerol (TAG) and reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations.

DESIGN

Thirty-two healthy volunteers participated in the trial, which consisted of four study groups (n = 8): low-fat diet with fish oil supplementation, low-fat diet without fish oil supplementation, full-fat diet with fish oil supplementation and full-fat diet without fish oil supplementation. Low-fat dietary treatment reduced dietary energy derived from fat by at least 10% and the low-dose of fish oil provided 1 g n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) daily. The postprandial response to a fat-rich test meal (0.5 g/kg pre-trial body weight) was investigated before and after 16 weeks dietary intervention.

RESULTS

Fasting plasma TAG concentrations were significantly (P < or = 0.05) reduced by fish oil supplementation and significantly (P < or = 0.05) increased by the low-fat diet alone but not significantly affected following the low-fat diet with fish oil supplementation. The postprandial TAG response was significantly (P < or = 0.05) increased following the low-fat diet with fish oil supplementation.

CONCLUSION

This study demonstrated that some of the deleterious effects of a low-fat diet, reduced concentrations of the cardioprotective HDL2 cholesterol fraction and increased fasting plasma TAG concentrations were prevented when a low dose of fish oil was provided with a low-fat diet. However postprandial triacylglycerolaemia is adversely affected when the low-fat diet was supplemented with fish oil.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit of Nutrition and Dietetics, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St. James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8880041

Citation

Roche, H M., and M J. Gibney. "Postprandial Triacylglycerolaemia: the Effect of Low-fat Dietary Treatment With and Without Fish Oil Supplementation." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 50, no. 9, 1996, pp. 617-24.
Roche HM, Gibney MJ. Postprandial triacylglycerolaemia: the effect of low-fat dietary treatment with and without fish oil supplementation. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996;50(9):617-24.
Roche, H. M., & Gibney, M. J. (1996). Postprandial triacylglycerolaemia: the effect of low-fat dietary treatment with and without fish oil supplementation. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 50(9), 617-24.
Roche HM, Gibney MJ. Postprandial Triacylglycerolaemia: the Effect of Low-fat Dietary Treatment With and Without Fish Oil Supplementation. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996;50(9):617-24. PubMed PMID: 8880041.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Postprandial triacylglycerolaemia: the effect of low-fat dietary treatment with and without fish oil supplementation. AU - Roche,H M, AU - Gibney,M J, PY - 1996/9/1/pubmed PY - 1996/9/1/medline PY - 1996/9/1/entrez SP - 617 EP - 24 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 50 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study investigated whether a low-dose of fish oil had the ability to prevent the adverse effects associated with low-fat dietary treatment, namely elevated plasma triacylglycerol (TAG) and reduced high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations. DESIGN: Thirty-two healthy volunteers participated in the trial, which consisted of four study groups (n = 8): low-fat diet with fish oil supplementation, low-fat diet without fish oil supplementation, full-fat diet with fish oil supplementation and full-fat diet without fish oil supplementation. Low-fat dietary treatment reduced dietary energy derived from fat by at least 10% and the low-dose of fish oil provided 1 g n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) daily. The postprandial response to a fat-rich test meal (0.5 g/kg pre-trial body weight) was investigated before and after 16 weeks dietary intervention. RESULTS: Fasting plasma TAG concentrations were significantly (P < or = 0.05) reduced by fish oil supplementation and significantly (P < or = 0.05) increased by the low-fat diet alone but not significantly affected following the low-fat diet with fish oil supplementation. The postprandial TAG response was significantly (P < or = 0.05) increased following the low-fat diet with fish oil supplementation. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that some of the deleterious effects of a low-fat diet, reduced concentrations of the cardioprotective HDL2 cholesterol fraction and increased fasting plasma TAG concentrations were prevented when a low dose of fish oil was provided with a low-fat diet. However postprandial triacylglycerolaemia is adversely affected when the low-fat diet was supplemented with fish oil. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8880041/Postprandial_triacylglycerolaemia:_the_effect_of_low_fat_dietary_treatment_with_and_without_fish_oil_supplementation_ L2 - https://www.lens.org/lens/search?q=citation_id:8880041 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -