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Evaluation of hepatitis B and C viral markers: clinical significance in Asian and Caucasian patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in the United States of America.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 1996 Oct; 11(10):949-54.JG

Abstract

In order to evaluate the roles of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) and their clinical significance in Asian-American and Caucasian patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the USA, 110 HCC patients, seen in a community-based teaching hospital in the Los Angeles area over a 10 year period, were enrolled. Seventy-nine (72%) patients were Asian-American and 31 (28%) were Caucasians. Of the 110 HCC patients, 69 (63%) were positive for serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), 26 (24%) were positive for serum antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), five (all Asian-Americans) were positive for both markers; 11 (10%) patients had a history of alcoholism. HBsAg was detected in 63 (80%) Asian-American patients, significantly higher than in the six (19%) Caucasian HCC patients (P < 0.01). Anti-HCV was detected in 10 (32%) Caucasian and in 16 (20%) Asian-American HCC patients (P > 0.05). Among Asian-American HCC patients, anti-HCV was more prevalent in those who were HBsAg-negative than in the HBsAg-positive patients (69 vs 8%; P < 0.01). A history of alcoholism was obtained in nine (29%) Caucasian HCC patients, significantly higher than in the two (3%) Asian-American HCC patients (P < 0.05). Comparing HCC patients with positive HBsAg and with anti-HCV, HBsAg-positive HCC patients were younger, Asian-Americans and predominantly male; 38% had a family history of liver disease. In contrast, anti-HCV-positive HCC patients were older by nearly a decade and 46% had a history of blood transfusion. Using a stepwise logistic regression analysis, Asian race and patient age < 50 years were found to be independent predictors for HBsAg-positivity, while a history of blood transfusion was the only predictor for anti-HCV-positivity in HCC patients. There was no significant difference in the rate of cirrhosis, serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein and survival between HBsAg-positive and anti-HCV-positive HCC patients. In conclusion, chronic HBV infection was the major aetiological factor in Asian-American HCC patients, while chronic HCV infection and alcoholism were major aetiological factors in Caucasian HCC patients in the USA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Liver Centre, Huntington Memorial Hospital, Pasadena, California 91105, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8912133

Citation

Hwang, S J., et al. "Evaluation of Hepatitis B and C Viral Markers: Clinical Significance in Asian and Caucasian Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma in the United States of America." Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 11, no. 10, 1996, pp. 949-54.
Hwang SJ, Tong MJ, Lai PP, et al. Evaluation of hepatitis B and C viral markers: clinical significance in Asian and Caucasian patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in the United States of America. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 1996;11(10):949-54.
Hwang, S. J., Tong, M. J., Lai, P. P., Ko, E. S., Co, R. L., Chien, D., & Kuo, G. (1996). Evaluation of hepatitis B and C viral markers: clinical significance in Asian and Caucasian patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in the United States of America. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 11(10), 949-54.
Hwang SJ, et al. Evaluation of Hepatitis B and C Viral Markers: Clinical Significance in Asian and Caucasian Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma in the United States of America. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 1996;11(10):949-54. PubMed PMID: 8912133.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation of hepatitis B and C viral markers: clinical significance in Asian and Caucasian patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in the United States of America. AU - Hwang,S J, AU - Tong,M J, AU - Lai,P P, AU - Ko,E S, AU - Co,R L, AU - Chien,D, AU - Kuo,G, PY - 1996/10/1/pubmed PY - 1996/10/1/medline PY - 1996/10/1/entrez SP - 949 EP - 54 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. VL - 11 IS - 10 N2 - In order to evaluate the roles of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) and their clinical significance in Asian-American and Caucasian patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the USA, 110 HCC patients, seen in a community-based teaching hospital in the Los Angeles area over a 10 year period, were enrolled. Seventy-nine (72%) patients were Asian-American and 31 (28%) were Caucasians. Of the 110 HCC patients, 69 (63%) were positive for serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), 26 (24%) were positive for serum antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), five (all Asian-Americans) were positive for both markers; 11 (10%) patients had a history of alcoholism. HBsAg was detected in 63 (80%) Asian-American patients, significantly higher than in the six (19%) Caucasian HCC patients (P < 0.01). Anti-HCV was detected in 10 (32%) Caucasian and in 16 (20%) Asian-American HCC patients (P > 0.05). Among Asian-American HCC patients, anti-HCV was more prevalent in those who were HBsAg-negative than in the HBsAg-positive patients (69 vs 8%; P < 0.01). A history of alcoholism was obtained in nine (29%) Caucasian HCC patients, significantly higher than in the two (3%) Asian-American HCC patients (P < 0.05). Comparing HCC patients with positive HBsAg and with anti-HCV, HBsAg-positive HCC patients were younger, Asian-Americans and predominantly male; 38% had a family history of liver disease. In contrast, anti-HCV-positive HCC patients were older by nearly a decade and 46% had a history of blood transfusion. Using a stepwise logistic regression analysis, Asian race and patient age < 50 years were found to be independent predictors for HBsAg-positivity, while a history of blood transfusion was the only predictor for anti-HCV-positivity in HCC patients. There was no significant difference in the rate of cirrhosis, serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein and survival between HBsAg-positive and anti-HCV-positive HCC patients. In conclusion, chronic HBV infection was the major aetiological factor in Asian-American HCC patients, while chronic HCV infection and alcoholism were major aetiological factors in Caucasian HCC patients in the USA. SN - 0815-9319 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8912133/Evaluation_of_hepatitis_B_and_C_viral_markers:_clinical_significance_in_Asian_and_Caucasian_patients_with_hepatocellular_carcinoma_in_the_United_States_of_America_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0815-9319&amp;date=1996&amp;volume=11&amp;issue=10&amp;spage=949 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -