Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Gender differences in smoking and risk for oral cancer.
Cancer Res. 1996 Nov 15; 56(22):5192-7.CR

Abstract

Based on studies that show gender differences in cigarette smoking and lung cancer risk, we hypothesized that sex differences also exist in the risk for cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx. A hospital-based study of 1009 patients with oral neoplasia and 923 age-matched controls was conducted from 1981-1990. All subjects were interviewed directly with an extensive questionnaire containing items on tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, and occupational exposures. Using a cumulative lifetime measure of exposure to cigarette tar, the adjusted odds ratio for men, according to increasing quartile of tar consumption and relative to never smokers, was 1.0 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.6-1.6) for the lowest category, 0.9 (95% CI, 0.6-1.6) for the second category, 1.6 (95% CI, 1.0-2.5) for the third category, and 2.1 (95p5 CI, 1.4-3.2) for the highest category. Among women, the corresponding odds ratios were 1.8 (95% CI, 1.1-3.0), 2.8 (95% CI, 1.6-4.9), 3.2 (95% CI, 1.9-5.6), and 4.6 (95% CI, 2.5-8.7). The linear increase in risk was significantly higher for women than for men. Among nonsmoking cases, there was a significantly higher proportion of women than men over the age of 50 years. This was consistent for all subsites within the oral cavity. These findings support the hypothesis that there are gender differences in the smoking-related risks for oral cancer and in the risk for nonsmoking-related oral cancer as well. The role of nutrition in relation to these findings is discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology, American Health Foundation, New York, New York 10017, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8912856

Citation

Muscat, J E., et al. "Gender Differences in Smoking and Risk for Oral Cancer." Cancer Research, vol. 56, no. 22, 1996, pp. 5192-7.
Muscat JE, Richie JP, Thompson S, et al. Gender differences in smoking and risk for oral cancer. Cancer Res. 1996;56(22):5192-7.
Muscat, J. E., Richie, J. P., Thompson, S., & Wynder, E. L. (1996). Gender differences in smoking and risk for oral cancer. Cancer Research, 56(22), 5192-7.
Muscat JE, et al. Gender Differences in Smoking and Risk for Oral Cancer. Cancer Res. 1996 Nov 15;56(22):5192-7. PubMed PMID: 8912856.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender differences in smoking and risk for oral cancer. AU - Muscat,J E, AU - Richie,J P,Jr AU - Thompson,S, AU - Wynder,E L, PY - 1996/11/15/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1996/11/15/entrez SP - 5192 EP - 7 JF - Cancer research JO - Cancer Res. VL - 56 IS - 22 N2 - Based on studies that show gender differences in cigarette smoking and lung cancer risk, we hypothesized that sex differences also exist in the risk for cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx. A hospital-based study of 1009 patients with oral neoplasia and 923 age-matched controls was conducted from 1981-1990. All subjects were interviewed directly with an extensive questionnaire containing items on tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, and occupational exposures. Using a cumulative lifetime measure of exposure to cigarette tar, the adjusted odds ratio for men, according to increasing quartile of tar consumption and relative to never smokers, was 1.0 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.6-1.6) for the lowest category, 0.9 (95% CI, 0.6-1.6) for the second category, 1.6 (95% CI, 1.0-2.5) for the third category, and 2.1 (95p5 CI, 1.4-3.2) for the highest category. Among women, the corresponding odds ratios were 1.8 (95% CI, 1.1-3.0), 2.8 (95% CI, 1.6-4.9), 3.2 (95% CI, 1.9-5.6), and 4.6 (95% CI, 2.5-8.7). The linear increase in risk was significantly higher for women than for men. Among nonsmoking cases, there was a significantly higher proportion of women than men over the age of 50 years. This was consistent for all subsites within the oral cavity. These findings support the hypothesis that there are gender differences in the smoking-related risks for oral cancer and in the risk for nonsmoking-related oral cancer as well. The role of nutrition in relation to these findings is discussed. SN - 0008-5472 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8912856/Gender_differences_in_smoking_and_risk_for_oral_cancer_ L2 - http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=8912856 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -