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Epidemiology of recreational and old-timer ice hockey injuries.
Clin J Sport Med 1996; 6(1):15-21CJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the nature and incidence of injuries suffered by a sample of recreational and old-timer ice hockey players.

DESIGN

Random sample of teams followed prospectively.

SETTING

Various hockey rinks in the Greater Edmonton Region.

PARTICIPANTS

Four hundred and thirty-one subjects--287 adult male recreational (AMRL) and 144 male old-timer (OTL) from five leagues were followed over the 1992-93 hockey season.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Injuries sustained during the duration of a hockey season.

RESULTS

A total of 151 injuries (100 AMRL and 51 OTL) were reported. The aggregate injury rate was 12.2/1000 player-exposures (12.3 AMRL and 12.0 OTL). The anatomic region most often injured by AMRL players was the head/neck/facial area (32%) while OTL players reported a greater proportion of lower extremity injuries (40%). Both groups reported sprains/strains as the most common diagnosis (35% AMRL and 47% OTL). The predominant injury mechanism for AMRL players was stick contact (24%) and for OTL players was puck contact (23%). No significant differences were detected between the anatomic, diagnostic, and mechanistic distributions of injury between AMRL and OTL players. Seventy-five percent of injuries occurred during league games, 10% during playoff games, 5% during tournament games, and 10% during practices. Penalties were assessed in 31% of injury instances. Forty-two percent of head/neck/facial injuries, 32% of upper extremity injuries, 13% of torso injuries, and 15% of lower extremity occurred as a result of penalizable behavior (p = 0.01). Three percent of players wearing full or half face protectors suffered facial injuries while 9% of players not wearing facial protection reported facial injuries (p = 0.03; Relative Risk = 2.56).

CONCLUSIONS

The injury rates observed were lower than reported rates for major/elite hockey. The proportion of players injured through body contact was lower than that observed in adult major/elite hockey while the diagnostic and anatomic distribution of injury was similar. Studies such as this are useful in the development of injury prevention strategies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physical Education and Sport Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8925359

Citation

Voaklander, D C., et al. "Epidemiology of Recreational and Old-timer Ice Hockey Injuries." Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine : Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine, vol. 6, no. 1, 1996, pp. 15-21.
Voaklander DC, Saunders LD, Quinney HA, et al. Epidemiology of recreational and old-timer ice hockey injuries. Clin J Sport Med. 1996;6(1):15-21.
Voaklander, D. C., Saunders, L. D., Quinney, H. A., & Macnab, R. B. (1996). Epidemiology of recreational and old-timer ice hockey injuries. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine : Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine, 6(1), pp. 15-21.
Voaklander DC, et al. Epidemiology of Recreational and Old-timer Ice Hockey Injuries. Clin J Sport Med. 1996;6(1):15-21. PubMed PMID: 8925359.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of recreational and old-timer ice hockey injuries. AU - Voaklander,D C, AU - Saunders,L D, AU - Quinney,H A, AU - Macnab,R B, PY - 1996/1/1/pubmed PY - 1996/1/1/medline PY - 1996/1/1/entrez SP - 15 EP - 21 JF - Clinical journal of sport medicine : official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine JO - Clin J Sport Med VL - 6 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the nature and incidence of injuries suffered by a sample of recreational and old-timer ice hockey players. DESIGN: Random sample of teams followed prospectively. SETTING: Various hockey rinks in the Greater Edmonton Region. PARTICIPANTS: Four hundred and thirty-one subjects--287 adult male recreational (AMRL) and 144 male old-timer (OTL) from five leagues were followed over the 1992-93 hockey season. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Injuries sustained during the duration of a hockey season. RESULTS: A total of 151 injuries (100 AMRL and 51 OTL) were reported. The aggregate injury rate was 12.2/1000 player-exposures (12.3 AMRL and 12.0 OTL). The anatomic region most often injured by AMRL players was the head/neck/facial area (32%) while OTL players reported a greater proportion of lower extremity injuries (40%). Both groups reported sprains/strains as the most common diagnosis (35% AMRL and 47% OTL). The predominant injury mechanism for AMRL players was stick contact (24%) and for OTL players was puck contact (23%). No significant differences were detected between the anatomic, diagnostic, and mechanistic distributions of injury between AMRL and OTL players. Seventy-five percent of injuries occurred during league games, 10% during playoff games, 5% during tournament games, and 10% during practices. Penalties were assessed in 31% of injury instances. Forty-two percent of head/neck/facial injuries, 32% of upper extremity injuries, 13% of torso injuries, and 15% of lower extremity occurred as a result of penalizable behavior (p = 0.01). Three percent of players wearing full or half face protectors suffered facial injuries while 9% of players not wearing facial protection reported facial injuries (p = 0.03; Relative Risk = 2.56). CONCLUSIONS: The injury rates observed were lower than reported rates for major/elite hockey. The proportion of players injured through body contact was lower than that observed in adult major/elite hockey while the diagnostic and anatomic distribution of injury was similar. Studies such as this are useful in the development of injury prevention strategies. SN - 1050-642X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8925359/Epidemiology_of_recreational_and_old_timer_ice_hockey_injuries_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=8925359.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -