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Age and religion selection biases in HIV-1 prevalence data from antenatal clinics in Manicaland, Zimbabwe.
Cent Afr J Med. 1995 Nov; 41(11):339-46.CA

Abstract

Sera from 487 women attending antenatal clinics in two areas of Manicaland were tested for the presence of HIV-1 infection. In the Honde Valley and Rusitu Valley areas, 24,3 pc and 14 pc respectively, were found to be infected. HIV-1 infection was found to be associated with age, marital status and location. Younger women, non-married women and women living in the Honde Valley were all more likely to be infected. There was also a weak association with level of education, with women with secondary education being at greater risk of being infected. The unadjusted overall figures for HIV-1 prevalence from the antenatal clinics were shown to provide a poor indication of the relative levels of prevalence of infection in the two study areas because of differences in the age structure and religious affiliations of the antenatal clinic and study populations. Similar problems may exist in sentinel surveillance data and would distort comparisons between locations and over time, especially during periods of rapid fertility change. In particular, the age bias is liable to exaggerate differences between urban and rural populations in developing societies. Where comparable information is available for the general population and sample sizes permit, this problem may be overcome by collecting basic socio-demographic data on the individuals tested and then applying standardization techniques. In the Honde Valley and Rusitu Valley example, the levels of HIV-1 prevalence after adjusting for age differences are 18,4 pc and 13,2 pc respectively.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Blair Research Institute, Harare, Zimbabwe.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8932576

Citation

Gregson, S, et al. "Age and Religion Selection Biases in HIV-1 Prevalence Data From Antenatal Clinics in Manicaland, Zimbabwe." The Central African Journal of Medicine, vol. 41, no. 11, 1995, pp. 339-46.
Gregson S, Zhuwau T, Anderson RM, et al. Age and religion selection biases in HIV-1 prevalence data from antenatal clinics in Manicaland, Zimbabwe. Cent Afr J Med. 1995;41(11):339-46.
Gregson, S., Zhuwau, T., Anderson, R. M., Chimbadzwa, T., & Chiwandiwa, S. K. (1995). Age and religion selection biases in HIV-1 prevalence data from antenatal clinics in Manicaland, Zimbabwe. The Central African Journal of Medicine, 41(11), 339-46.
Gregson S, et al. Age and Religion Selection Biases in HIV-1 Prevalence Data From Antenatal Clinics in Manicaland, Zimbabwe. Cent Afr J Med. 1995;41(11):339-46. PubMed PMID: 8932576.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Age and religion selection biases in HIV-1 prevalence data from antenatal clinics in Manicaland, Zimbabwe. AU - Gregson,S, AU - Zhuwau,T, AU - Anderson,R M, AU - Chimbadzwa,T, AU - Chiwandiwa,S K, PY - 1995/11/1/pubmed PY - 1995/11/1/medline PY - 1995/11/1/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Age Factors KW - Bias KW - Critique KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Eastern Africa KW - English Speaking Africa KW - Error Sources KW - Hiv Infections KW - Measurement KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Pregnant Women KW - Prevalence KW - Religion KW - Research Methodology KW - Respondents--women KW - Sampling Studies KW - Studies KW - Surveys KW - Viral Diseases KW - Zimbabwe SP - 339 EP - 46 JF - The Central African journal of medicine JO - Cent Afr J Med VL - 41 IS - 11 N2 - Sera from 487 women attending antenatal clinics in two areas of Manicaland were tested for the presence of HIV-1 infection. In the Honde Valley and Rusitu Valley areas, 24,3 pc and 14 pc respectively, were found to be infected. HIV-1 infection was found to be associated with age, marital status and location. Younger women, non-married women and women living in the Honde Valley were all more likely to be infected. There was also a weak association with level of education, with women with secondary education being at greater risk of being infected. The unadjusted overall figures for HIV-1 prevalence from the antenatal clinics were shown to provide a poor indication of the relative levels of prevalence of infection in the two study areas because of differences in the age structure and religious affiliations of the antenatal clinic and study populations. Similar problems may exist in sentinel surveillance data and would distort comparisons between locations and over time, especially during periods of rapid fertility change. In particular, the age bias is liable to exaggerate differences between urban and rural populations in developing societies. Where comparable information is available for the general population and sample sizes permit, this problem may be overcome by collecting basic socio-demographic data on the individuals tested and then applying standardization techniques. In the Honde Valley and Rusitu Valley example, the levels of HIV-1 prevalence after adjusting for age differences are 18,4 pc and 13,2 pc respectively. SN - 0008-9176 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8932576/Age_and_religion_selection_biases_in_HIV_1_prevalence_data_from_antenatal_clinics_in_Manicaland_Zimbabwe_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/9735 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -