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Effect of extreme fish consumption on dietary and plasma antioxidant levels and fatty acid composition.
Eur J Clin Nutr 1996; 50(11):741-6EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the effects of high-fish and low-fish diets on plasma concentrations of fatty acids and selected antioxidants.

DESIGN AND SUBJECTS

The effects of fish consumption on dietary and plasma antioxidant levels and fatty acid composition were studied as part of a large dietary survey of Finnish adults (n = 1861). High-fish consumers were matched with low-fish consumers and 41 pairs were identified. The members of each pair were of the same sex, from the same 10 y age group, and from the same or adjacent areas. There were 21 men and 20 women in each group, with a mean age of 54.3 y.

METHODS

The fish consumption of the subjects was investigated with a qualitative food questionnaire. Additionally, a 3 d food record was used to estimate the diet. Two indices were defined to describe the oxidation potential of the diets. The plasma alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, and beta-carotene concentrations and various fatty acids were analysed.

RESULTS

The mean fish intake was 103 g/d in the high-fish and 5 g/d in the low-fish group. The dietary intakes of vitamin C, protein, total n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, mercury, selenium, and salt and the theoretical oxidative potential were higher (P < 0.05) and the saturated fatty acid intake lower (P < 0.01) in the high-fish than in the low-fish group. The dietary vitamin E intake was similar in both groups but the ratio of dietary vitamin E/PUFA was higher (P < 0.01) in the high-fish than in the low-fish group (0.85 and 0.75, respectively). The plasma n-3 PUFAs were higher (P < 0.001) and n-6 PUFAs lower (P < 0.001) in the high-fish than in the low-fish group. There were no differences in plasma antioxidant levels between the groups.

CONCLUSION

This study shows that extreme fish consumption does not affect plasma antioxidant levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8933121

Citation

Anttolainen, M, et al. "Effect of Extreme Fish Consumption On Dietary and Plasma Antioxidant Levels and Fatty Acid Composition." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 50, no. 11, 1996, pp. 741-6.
Anttolainen M, Valsta LM, Alfthan G, et al. Effect of extreme fish consumption on dietary and plasma antioxidant levels and fatty acid composition. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996;50(11):741-6.
Anttolainen, M., Valsta, L. M., Alfthan, G., Kleemola, P., Salminen, I., & Tamminen, M. (1996). Effect of extreme fish consumption on dietary and plasma antioxidant levels and fatty acid composition. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 50(11), pp. 741-6.
Anttolainen M, et al. Effect of Extreme Fish Consumption On Dietary and Plasma Antioxidant Levels and Fatty Acid Composition. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1996;50(11):741-6. PubMed PMID: 8933121.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of extreme fish consumption on dietary and plasma antioxidant levels and fatty acid composition. AU - Anttolainen,M, AU - Valsta,L M, AU - Alfthan,G, AU - Kleemola,P, AU - Salminen,I, AU - Tamminen,M, PY - 1996/11/1/pubmed PY - 1996/11/1/medline PY - 1996/11/1/entrez SP - 741 EP - 6 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 50 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of high-fish and low-fish diets on plasma concentrations of fatty acids and selected antioxidants. DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: The effects of fish consumption on dietary and plasma antioxidant levels and fatty acid composition were studied as part of a large dietary survey of Finnish adults (n = 1861). High-fish consumers were matched with low-fish consumers and 41 pairs were identified. The members of each pair were of the same sex, from the same 10 y age group, and from the same or adjacent areas. There were 21 men and 20 women in each group, with a mean age of 54.3 y. METHODS: The fish consumption of the subjects was investigated with a qualitative food questionnaire. Additionally, a 3 d food record was used to estimate the diet. Two indices were defined to describe the oxidation potential of the diets. The plasma alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, and beta-carotene concentrations and various fatty acids were analysed. RESULTS: The mean fish intake was 103 g/d in the high-fish and 5 g/d in the low-fish group. The dietary intakes of vitamin C, protein, total n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, mercury, selenium, and salt and the theoretical oxidative potential were higher (P < 0.05) and the saturated fatty acid intake lower (P < 0.01) in the high-fish than in the low-fish group. The dietary vitamin E intake was similar in both groups but the ratio of dietary vitamin E/PUFA was higher (P < 0.01) in the high-fish than in the low-fish group (0.85 and 0.75, respectively). The plasma n-3 PUFAs were higher (P < 0.001) and n-6 PUFAs lower (P < 0.001) in the high-fish than in the low-fish group. There were no differences in plasma antioxidant levels between the groups. CONCLUSION: This study shows that extreme fish consumption does not affect plasma antioxidant levels. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8933121/Effect_of_extreme_fish_consumption_on_dietary_and_plasma_antioxidant_levels_and_fatty_acid_composition_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/vitamine.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -