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Imagining projective transformations: aligned orientations in spatial organization.
Cogn Psychol. 1996 Oct; 31(2):125-67.CP

Abstract

Four experiments were conducted to investigate whether variations in orientation that profoundly affect the ability to imagine rotations also affect the ability to imagine projective transformations. For a basic rectilinear object and the three simpler Platonic Solids, imagining projective transformations (e.g., the casting of a shadow) was quite successful when the objects were aligned with the direction of projection. For the solids, this alignment occurred when the objects were generalized cylinders about axes aligned with the projection. As the objects were made more oblique to the projection, performance deteriorated markedly. When the objects were moderately aligned with the projection, performance depended on the orientation of the object and the orientation of the projection to the environment. We suggest that the imagination of projection and of rotation is a type of problem solving in which spatial structures are organized in relation to initially given properties of the objects and transformations. When there is alignment among the various structural components, this process of imagination works efficiently. Without such alignment, nonexperts often fail. We suggest that aligned (i.e., parallel and perpendicular) orientations are effective in spatial imagination because they are categorically distinct and singular, and they provide a critical form of redundancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA. pani@cc.gatech.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8936487

Citation

Pani, J R., et al. "Imagining Projective Transformations: Aligned Orientations in Spatial Organization." Cognitive Psychology, vol. 31, no. 2, 1996, pp. 125-67.
Pani JR, Jeffres JA, Shippey GT, et al. Imagining projective transformations: aligned orientations in spatial organization. Cogn Psychol. 1996;31(2):125-67.
Pani, J. R., Jeffres, J. A., Shippey, G. T., & Schwartz, K. J. (1996). Imagining projective transformations: aligned orientations in spatial organization. Cognitive Psychology, 31(2), 125-67.
Pani JR, et al. Imagining Projective Transformations: Aligned Orientations in Spatial Organization. Cogn Psychol. 1996;31(2):125-67. PubMed PMID: 8936487.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Imagining projective transformations: aligned orientations in spatial organization. AU - Pani,J R, AU - Jeffres,J A, AU - Shippey,G T, AU - Schwartz,K J, PY - 1996/10/1/pubmed PY - 1996/10/1/medline PY - 1996/10/1/entrez SP - 125 EP - 67 JF - Cognitive psychology JO - Cogn Psychol VL - 31 IS - 2 N2 - Four experiments were conducted to investigate whether variations in orientation that profoundly affect the ability to imagine rotations also affect the ability to imagine projective transformations. For a basic rectilinear object and the three simpler Platonic Solids, imagining projective transformations (e.g., the casting of a shadow) was quite successful when the objects were aligned with the direction of projection. For the solids, this alignment occurred when the objects were generalized cylinders about axes aligned with the projection. As the objects were made more oblique to the projection, performance deteriorated markedly. When the objects were moderately aligned with the projection, performance depended on the orientation of the object and the orientation of the projection to the environment. We suggest that the imagination of projection and of rotation is a type of problem solving in which spatial structures are organized in relation to initially given properties of the objects and transformations. When there is alignment among the various structural components, this process of imagination works efficiently. Without such alignment, nonexperts often fail. We suggest that aligned (i.e., parallel and perpendicular) orientations are effective in spatial imagination because they are categorically distinct and singular, and they provide a critical form of redundancy. SN - 0010-0285 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8936487/Imagining_projective_transformations:_aligned_orientations_in_spatial_organization_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0010-0285(96)90015-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -