Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Smoking, smoking cessation, and understanding of the role of multiple cardiac risk factors among the urban poor.
Prev Med 1996 Nov-Dec; 25(6):653-9PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine in a population of low socioeconomic status (SES) patients: (a) rates of current smoking and smoking cessation, (b) persons' understanding of the adverse health impact of multiple cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, and (c) if the diagnosis of other CVD risk factors, specifically hypertension or hypercholesterolemia, was related to smoking cessation.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional interview survey.

SETTING

Community clinics and eligibility centers of the Harris County Hospital District (HD), which provides primary care to over 166,000 indigent persons in Houston, Texas.

SUBJECTS

Randomly selected adults attending an HD setting for eligibility screening or primary care.

RESULTS

Over 93% of subjects approached participated (n = 547). Their mean age was 40.7 years, 55% were female, and 39% had > 9 years of education. The ethnic distribution was 54% Hispanic, 28% black, and 14% non-Hispanic white. Current smoking ranged from 10% among Hispanic females to 56% among black males. The percentage of ever smokers who had quit was 24% among black males, 44% among black females, 43% among Hispanic males, and 70% among Hispanic females. The majority recognized the increase in danger from smoking in the presence of hypertension or hypercholesterolemia. Among patients who were smokers when they found out they had hypertension (n = 70), 65% reported it increased their desire to quit. After adjustment for other variables including age and known CVD, predictors of being an ex-smoker were being female (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.5), being Hispanic (OR 2.8 95% CI 1.5-5.7), and having hypertension (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-4.2).

CONCLUSION

In this low SES population, there was substantial smoking cessation, widespread acknowledgment of the cumulative effect of smoking and other CVD risk factors, and some evidence that smoking cessation increased after the diagnosis of hypertension.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8936566

Citation

Hyman, D J., et al. "Smoking, Smoking Cessation, and Understanding of the Role of Multiple Cardiac Risk Factors Among the Urban Poor." Preventive Medicine, vol. 25, no. 6, 1996, pp. 653-9.
Hyman DJ, Simons-Morton DG, Dunn JK, et al. Smoking, smoking cessation, and understanding of the role of multiple cardiac risk factors among the urban poor. Prev Med. 1996;25(6):653-9.
Hyman, D. J., Simons-Morton, D. G., Dunn, J. K., & Ho, K. (1996). Smoking, smoking cessation, and understanding of the role of multiple cardiac risk factors among the urban poor. Preventive Medicine, 25(6), pp. 653-9.
Hyman DJ, et al. Smoking, Smoking Cessation, and Understanding of the Role of Multiple Cardiac Risk Factors Among the Urban Poor. Prev Med. 1996;25(6):653-9. PubMed PMID: 8936566.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking, smoking cessation, and understanding of the role of multiple cardiac risk factors among the urban poor. AU - Hyman,D J, AU - Simons-Morton,D G, AU - Dunn,J K, AU - Ho,K, PY - 1996/11/1/pubmed PY - 1996/11/1/medline PY - 1996/11/1/entrez SP - 653 EP - 9 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 25 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine in a population of low socioeconomic status (SES) patients: (a) rates of current smoking and smoking cessation, (b) persons' understanding of the adverse health impact of multiple cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, and (c) if the diagnosis of other CVD risk factors, specifically hypertension or hypercholesterolemia, was related to smoking cessation. DESIGN: Cross-sectional interview survey. SETTING: Community clinics and eligibility centers of the Harris County Hospital District (HD), which provides primary care to over 166,000 indigent persons in Houston, Texas. SUBJECTS: Randomly selected adults attending an HD setting for eligibility screening or primary care. RESULTS: Over 93% of subjects approached participated (n = 547). Their mean age was 40.7 years, 55% were female, and 39% had > 9 years of education. The ethnic distribution was 54% Hispanic, 28% black, and 14% non-Hispanic white. Current smoking ranged from 10% among Hispanic females to 56% among black males. The percentage of ever smokers who had quit was 24% among black males, 44% among black females, 43% among Hispanic males, and 70% among Hispanic females. The majority recognized the increase in danger from smoking in the presence of hypertension or hypercholesterolemia. Among patients who were smokers when they found out they had hypertension (n = 70), 65% reported it increased their desire to quit. After adjustment for other variables including age and known CVD, predictors of being an ex-smoker were being female (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.5), being Hispanic (OR 2.8 95% CI 1.5-5.7), and having hypertension (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-4.2). CONCLUSION: In this low SES population, there was substantial smoking cessation, widespread acknowledgment of the cumulative effect of smoking and other CVD risk factors, and some evidence that smoking cessation increased after the diagnosis of hypertension. SN - 0091-7435 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8936566/Smoking_smoking_cessation_and_understanding_of_the_role_of_multiple_cardiac_risk_factors_among_the_urban_poor_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(96)90103-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -