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Activity of hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzymes in rats fed alpha-linolenic acid.
Biochim Biophys Acta. 1996 Nov 22; 1304(2):105-19.BB

Abstract

The activity of hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzymes in rats fed linseed and perilla oils rich in alpha-linolenic acid (alpha-18:3) was compared to that in rats fed safflower oil rich in linoleic acid (18:2) and a saturated fat (palm oil). Palm and safflower oils were essentially devoid of alpha-18:3. The palmitoyl-CoA oxidation rates both in mitochondrial and peroxisomal pathways in liver homogenates were significantly higher in rats fed linseed oil than in those fed palm and safflower oils. Among rats fed diets containing palm oil, safflower oil, fat mixtures composed of safflower and perilla oils (2:1, w/w and 1:2, w/w), and perilla oil, mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty oxidation rates increased with increasing dietary levels of perilla oil. Compared to palm and safflower oils, dietary alpha-18:3 either in the form of linseed or perilla oils profoundly increased the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase, acyl-CoA oxidase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase, and 2,4-dienoyl-CoA reductase. Smaller but significant increases by dietary alpha-18:3 of the activity of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, enoyl-CoA hydratase, and delta 3, delta 2-enoyl-CoA isomerase were also observed. Unexpectedly, dietary alpha-18:3 greatly reduced the activity of 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Compared to palm oil, dietary polyunsaturated fats significantly reduced the activity of fatty acid synthetase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase to the same levels. The activity of pyruvate kinase was significantly higher in rats fed palm oil than in those fed polyunsaturated fats. The extent of reduction was more prominent with polyunsaturated fats containing alpha-18:3 than with safflower oil devoid of alpha-18:3. Thus, compared to linoleic acid and saturated fatty acids, dietary alpha-18:3 caused characteristic changes in the activity of hepatic enzymes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism in rats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Nutrition Biochemistry, National Food Research Institute, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Ibaraki, Japan.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8954134

Citation

Kabir, Y, and T Ide. "Activity of Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation Enzymes in Rats Fed Alpha-linolenic Acid." Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta, vol. 1304, no. 2, 1996, pp. 105-19.
Kabir Y, Ide T. Activity of hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzymes in rats fed alpha-linolenic acid. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1996;1304(2):105-19.
Kabir, Y., & Ide, T. (1996). Activity of hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzymes in rats fed alpha-linolenic acid. Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta, 1304(2), 105-19.
Kabir Y, Ide T. Activity of Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation Enzymes in Rats Fed Alpha-linolenic Acid. Biochim Biophys Acta. 1996 Nov 22;1304(2):105-19. PubMed PMID: 8954134.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Activity of hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzymes in rats fed alpha-linolenic acid. AU - Kabir,Y, AU - Ide,T, PY - 1996/11/22/pubmed PY - 1996/11/22/medline PY - 1996/11/22/entrez SP - 105 EP - 19 JF - Biochimica et biophysica acta JO - Biochim. Biophys. Acta VL - 1304 IS - 2 N2 - The activity of hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzymes in rats fed linseed and perilla oils rich in alpha-linolenic acid (alpha-18:3) was compared to that in rats fed safflower oil rich in linoleic acid (18:2) and a saturated fat (palm oil). Palm and safflower oils were essentially devoid of alpha-18:3. The palmitoyl-CoA oxidation rates both in mitochondrial and peroxisomal pathways in liver homogenates were significantly higher in rats fed linseed oil than in those fed palm and safflower oils. Among rats fed diets containing palm oil, safflower oil, fat mixtures composed of safflower and perilla oils (2:1, w/w and 1:2, w/w), and perilla oil, mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty oxidation rates increased with increasing dietary levels of perilla oil. Compared to palm and safflower oils, dietary alpha-18:3 either in the form of linseed or perilla oils profoundly increased the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase, acyl-CoA oxidase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase, and 2,4-dienoyl-CoA reductase. Smaller but significant increases by dietary alpha-18:3 of the activity of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, enoyl-CoA hydratase, and delta 3, delta 2-enoyl-CoA isomerase were also observed. Unexpectedly, dietary alpha-18:3 greatly reduced the activity of 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Compared to palm oil, dietary polyunsaturated fats significantly reduced the activity of fatty acid synthetase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase to the same levels. The activity of pyruvate kinase was significantly higher in rats fed palm oil than in those fed polyunsaturated fats. The extent of reduction was more prominent with polyunsaturated fats containing alpha-18:3 than with safflower oil devoid of alpha-18:3. Thus, compared to linoleic acid and saturated fatty acids, dietary alpha-18:3 caused characteristic changes in the activity of hepatic enzymes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism in rats. SN - 0006-3002 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8954134/Activity_of_hepatic_fatty_acid_oxidation_enzymes_in_rats_fed_alpha_linolenic_acid_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0005-2760(96)00110-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -