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Serum anticholinergic activity and behavior following atropine sulfate administration in the rat.
Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1997 Jan; 56(1):151-4.PB

Abstract

Anticholinergic agents such as atropine and scopolamine have long been suggested to produce delirium-like states in humans and experimental animals. Evidence for an anticholinergic mechanism in the pathogenesis of human delirium has accumulated, leading to studies of the behavioral effects of the anticholinergic drug atropine in animals. The current study addresses the adequacy of animal models of delirium in terms of sensitivity, specificity and pharmacological relevance. A multiple fixed-ratio fixed-interval reinforcement schedule was used to test the effects of relatively low doses of atropine on behavior in rats. Additionally, total serum anticholinergic activity (SAA) was measured under dose and time course conditions identical to those used in the behavioral study. Atropine reduced high and low rates of responding in a dose-dependent manner, and SAA increased in a dose dependent manner. SAA at atropine doses of 0.1 mg/kg to 1.0 mg/kg was similar to that found in delirious humans. These behavioral and serum level data suggest that relatively low doses of atropine, substantially below those used in previous attempts to model delirium using rats, may be more pharmacologically relevant to delirium and may minimize non-specific peripheral effects of this drug.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center (GRECC), VA Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN 55417, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8981623

Citation

O'Hare, E, et al. "Serum Anticholinergic Activity and Behavior Following Atropine Sulfate Administration in the Rat." Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, vol. 56, no. 1, 1997, pp. 151-4.
O'Hare E, Weldon DT, Bettin K, et al. Serum anticholinergic activity and behavior following atropine sulfate administration in the rat. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1997;56(1):151-4.
O'Hare, E., Weldon, D. T., Bettin, K., Cleary, J., & Mach, J. R. (1997). Serum anticholinergic activity and behavior following atropine sulfate administration in the rat. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, 56(1), 151-4.
O'Hare E, et al. Serum Anticholinergic Activity and Behavior Following Atropine Sulfate Administration in the Rat. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1997;56(1):151-4. PubMed PMID: 8981623.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum anticholinergic activity and behavior following atropine sulfate administration in the rat. AU - O'Hare,E, AU - Weldon,D T, AU - Bettin,K, AU - Cleary,J, AU - Mach,J R,Jr PY - 1997/1/1/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1997/1/1/entrez SP - 151 EP - 4 JF - Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior JO - Pharmacol Biochem Behav VL - 56 IS - 1 N2 - Anticholinergic agents such as atropine and scopolamine have long been suggested to produce delirium-like states in humans and experimental animals. Evidence for an anticholinergic mechanism in the pathogenesis of human delirium has accumulated, leading to studies of the behavioral effects of the anticholinergic drug atropine in animals. The current study addresses the adequacy of animal models of delirium in terms of sensitivity, specificity and pharmacological relevance. A multiple fixed-ratio fixed-interval reinforcement schedule was used to test the effects of relatively low doses of atropine on behavior in rats. Additionally, total serum anticholinergic activity (SAA) was measured under dose and time course conditions identical to those used in the behavioral study. Atropine reduced high and low rates of responding in a dose-dependent manner, and SAA increased in a dose dependent manner. SAA at atropine doses of 0.1 mg/kg to 1.0 mg/kg was similar to that found in delirious humans. These behavioral and serum level data suggest that relatively low doses of atropine, substantially below those used in previous attempts to model delirium using rats, may be more pharmacologically relevant to delirium and may minimize non-specific peripheral effects of this drug. SN - 0091-3057 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8981623/Serum_anticholinergic_activity_and_behavior_following_atropine_sulfate_administration_in_the_rat_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-3057(96)00172-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -