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Prospective study of moderate alcohol consumption and mortality in US male physicians.
Arch Intern Med 1997; 157(1):79-85AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although moderate alcohol consumption decreases the risk of myocardial infarction, its impact on all-cause mortality among apparently healthy men is unclear.

METHODS

We performed a prospective cohort study in 22071 men in the Physicians' Health Study. Participants were aged 40 to 84 years and had no history of myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or cancer.

RESULTS

There were 1206 deaths (394 cardiovascular, 488 cancer, and 324 other) during 10.7 years of follow-up. Compared with participants who consumed less than 1 drink per week, the relative risk (95% confidence interval) of all-cause mortality for men who consumed 2 to 4 drinks per week was 0.72 (0.59-0.87); 5 to 6 drinks per week, 0.79 (0.64-0.99); 1 drink per day, 0.98 (0.84-1.15); and the highest drinking group (> or = 2 drinks per day), 1.51 (1.17-1.95). This association was similar with either nondrinkers or occasional drinkers used as the reference group and was not subject to material confounding or effect modification by any factor examined. The overall relationship was the result of a J-shaped association with cardiovascular mortality, an increase in cancer deaths for the highest drinking group, and a U-shaped association with other causes of mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

Risk of all-cause mortality varies by level of alcohol consumption. In this apparently healthy cohort, men who consumed 2 to 6 drinks per week had the most favorable mortality profile and men who had 2 or more drinks per day the most unfavorable mortality profile. The difference between consumption of small and large amounts of alcohol may mean the difference between preventing and causing excess mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8996044

Citation

Camargo, C A., et al. "Prospective Study of Moderate Alcohol Consumption and Mortality in US Male Physicians." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 157, no. 1, 1997, pp. 79-85.
Camargo CA, Hennekens CH, Gaziano JM, et al. Prospective study of moderate alcohol consumption and mortality in US male physicians. Arch Intern Med. 1997;157(1):79-85.
Camargo, C. A., Hennekens, C. H., Gaziano, J. M., Glynn, R. J., Manson, J. E., & Stampfer, M. J. (1997). Prospective study of moderate alcohol consumption and mortality in US male physicians. Archives of Internal Medicine, 157(1), pp. 79-85.
Camargo CA, et al. Prospective Study of Moderate Alcohol Consumption and Mortality in US Male Physicians. Arch Intern Med. 1997 Jan 13;157(1):79-85. PubMed PMID: 8996044.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective study of moderate alcohol consumption and mortality in US male physicians. AU - Camargo,C A,Jr AU - Hennekens,C H, AU - Gaziano,J M, AU - Glynn,R J, AU - Manson,J E, AU - Stampfer,M J, PY - 1997/1/13/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1997/1/13/entrez SP - 79 EP - 85 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 157 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although moderate alcohol consumption decreases the risk of myocardial infarction, its impact on all-cause mortality among apparently healthy men is unclear. METHODS: We performed a prospective cohort study in 22071 men in the Physicians' Health Study. Participants were aged 40 to 84 years and had no history of myocardial infarction, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or cancer. RESULTS: There were 1206 deaths (394 cardiovascular, 488 cancer, and 324 other) during 10.7 years of follow-up. Compared with participants who consumed less than 1 drink per week, the relative risk (95% confidence interval) of all-cause mortality for men who consumed 2 to 4 drinks per week was 0.72 (0.59-0.87); 5 to 6 drinks per week, 0.79 (0.64-0.99); 1 drink per day, 0.98 (0.84-1.15); and the highest drinking group (> or = 2 drinks per day), 1.51 (1.17-1.95). This association was similar with either nondrinkers or occasional drinkers used as the reference group and was not subject to material confounding or effect modification by any factor examined. The overall relationship was the result of a J-shaped association with cardiovascular mortality, an increase in cancer deaths for the highest drinking group, and a U-shaped association with other causes of mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Risk of all-cause mortality varies by level of alcohol consumption. In this apparently healthy cohort, men who consumed 2 to 6 drinks per week had the most favorable mortality profile and men who had 2 or more drinks per day the most unfavorable mortality profile. The difference between consumption of small and large amounts of alcohol may mean the difference between preventing and causing excess mortality. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8996044/Prospective_study_of_moderate_alcohol_consumption_and_mortality_in_US_male_physicians_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/157/pg/79 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -