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Cross-validation of prediction equations for resting energy expenditure in young, healthy children.
J Am Diet Assoc 1997; 97(2):140-5JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the accuracy of several prediction equations for resting energy expenditure (REE) in children.

DESIGN

REE was measured in 113 prepubertal children (60 girls and 53 boys aged 3.9 to 7.8 years old, weighing 14.7 to 30.0 kg) using indirect calorimetry and compared with values estimated from the prediction equations of Altman and Dittmer, The Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization/United Nations University (FAO/WHO/UNU), Maffeis et al, and Harris and Benedict.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

Measured REE (MREE) was compared with predicted REE (PREE) by means of regression analysis. Prediction equations were considered accurate if the regression of MREE vs PREE was not significantly different from the line of identity (slope=1.0; intercept=0). Precision was assessed by the multiple correlation coefficient of the regression of MREE vs PREE.

RESULTS

MREE was 938+/-119 kcal/day, and PREE was 1,057+/-224 kcal/day for the Altman and Dittmer equations, 956+/-84 kcal/day for the FAO/WHO/UNU equations, 948+/-64 kcal/day for the equations of Maffeis et al, and 954+/-102 kcal/day for the Harris-Benedict equations. The regression of MREE vs PREE was significantly different from the line of identity for all prediction equations except the FAO/WHO/UNU equations (slope=0.96, P=.735; intercept=-15 kcal/day, P=.885 for girls and slope=1.08, P=.635; intercept=-62 kcal/day, P=.635 for boys). None of the equations was precise for MREE vs PREE (for all, R2<.6). For the FAO/WHO/UNU equations, less than half of the predictions were within +/-50 kcal/day but 99% were within 200 kcal/day.

CONCLUSION

Most prediction equations for REE in children do not accurately or precisely estimate REEs. The exception is the FAO/WHO/UNU equations, which are reasonably accurate and precise for practical purposes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama, Birmingham 35294, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9020240

Citation

Finan, K, et al. "Cross-validation of Prediction Equations for Resting Energy Expenditure in Young, Healthy Children." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 97, no. 2, 1997, pp. 140-5.
Finan K, Larson DE, Goran MI. Cross-validation of prediction equations for resting energy expenditure in young, healthy children. J Am Diet Assoc. 1997;97(2):140-5.
Finan, K., Larson, D. E., & Goran, M. I. (1997). Cross-validation of prediction equations for resting energy expenditure in young, healthy children. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 97(2), pp. 140-5.
Finan K, Larson DE, Goran MI. Cross-validation of Prediction Equations for Resting Energy Expenditure in Young, Healthy Children. J Am Diet Assoc. 1997;97(2):140-5. PubMed PMID: 9020240.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cross-validation of prediction equations for resting energy expenditure in young, healthy children. AU - Finan,K, AU - Larson,D E, AU - Goran,M I, PY - 1997/2/1/pubmed PY - 1997/2/1/medline PY - 1997/2/1/entrez SP - 140 EP - 5 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 97 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the accuracy of several prediction equations for resting energy expenditure (REE) in children. DESIGN: REE was measured in 113 prepubertal children (60 girls and 53 boys aged 3.9 to 7.8 years old, weighing 14.7 to 30.0 kg) using indirect calorimetry and compared with values estimated from the prediction equations of Altman and Dittmer, The Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization/United Nations University (FAO/WHO/UNU), Maffeis et al, and Harris and Benedict. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Measured REE (MREE) was compared with predicted REE (PREE) by means of regression analysis. Prediction equations were considered accurate if the regression of MREE vs PREE was not significantly different from the line of identity (slope=1.0; intercept=0). Precision was assessed by the multiple correlation coefficient of the regression of MREE vs PREE. RESULTS: MREE was 938+/-119 kcal/day, and PREE was 1,057+/-224 kcal/day for the Altman and Dittmer equations, 956+/-84 kcal/day for the FAO/WHO/UNU equations, 948+/-64 kcal/day for the equations of Maffeis et al, and 954+/-102 kcal/day for the Harris-Benedict equations. The regression of MREE vs PREE was significantly different from the line of identity for all prediction equations except the FAO/WHO/UNU equations (slope=0.96, P=.735; intercept=-15 kcal/day, P=.885 for girls and slope=1.08, P=.635; intercept=-62 kcal/day, P=.635 for boys). None of the equations was precise for MREE vs PREE (for all, R2<.6). For the FAO/WHO/UNU equations, less than half of the predictions were within +/-50 kcal/day but 99% were within 200 kcal/day. CONCLUSION: Most prediction equations for REE in children do not accurately or precisely estimate REEs. The exception is the FAO/WHO/UNU equations, which are reasonably accurate and precise for practical purposes. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9020240/Cross_validation_of_prediction_equations_for_resting_energy_expenditure_in_young_healthy_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(97)00039-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -