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Nutrient intakes by young children in a prospective randomized trial of a low-saturated fat, low-cholesterol diet. The STRIP Baby Project. Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project for Babies.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 1997; 151(2):181-8AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the impact of individualized and repeatedly given dietary counseling on fat intake and nutrient intake of children aged 8 months to 4 years.

DESIGN

Prospective randomized clinical trial.

PARTICIPANTS

Children (N = 1062) from 1054 families were randomized to an intervention (n = 540) or a control (n = 522) group when each child participant was 6 months old.

INTERVENTIONS

The children in the intervention group were counseled to reduce their intake of saturated fat and cholesterol but to ensure their adequate energy intake. Dietary issues were discussed with the families of the children in the control group only briefly according to the current practice of well-baby clinics.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Food consumption was evaluated by using 3- and 4-day food records that were kept at 5- to 12-month intervals, and nutrient intakes were analyzed with a Micro Nutrica computer program (Social Insurance Institution, Turku, Finland).

RESULTS

The intake of fat (29% of the energy intake) and cholesterol (70 mg) showed no differences between the groups of children at 8 months of age. The fat intake in the children in the intervention group was then continuously 2% of the energy intake below that of the children in the control group (P < .001). After the age of 13 months, the cholesterol intake of the children in the control group exceeded that of the children in the intervention group by 20 mg (P < .001). The children in the intervention group consumed 3% (of the energy intake) less saturated (P < .001) and 1% (of the energy intake) more polyunsaturated fats (P < .001) than did the children in the control group at age 13 months and older. The carbohydrate intake was slightly higher in the children in the intervention group than in the children in the control group. Intakes of vitamins, minerals, and trace elements showed no differences between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS

The intakes of fat by the children in the intervention and control groups were markedly below values that were recommended for the first 2 years of life. Despite the low intake of fat, the intake of other nutrients fulfilled current recommendations, except for vitamin D and iron. Individualized dietary counseling that led to clear changes in the type of fat intake had a minimal effect on vitamin or mineral intakes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cardiorespiratory Research Unit, University of Turku, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9041875

Citation

Lagström, H, et al. "Nutrient Intakes By Young Children in a Prospective Randomized Trial of a Low-saturated Fat, Low-cholesterol Diet. the STRIP Baby Project. Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project for Babies." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 151, no. 2, 1997, pp. 181-8.
Lagström H, Jokinen E, Seppänen R, et al. Nutrient intakes by young children in a prospective randomized trial of a low-saturated fat, low-cholesterol diet. The STRIP Baby Project. Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project for Babies. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1997;151(2):181-8.
Lagström, H., Jokinen, E., Seppänen, R., Rönnemaa, T., Viikari, J., Välimäki, I., ... Simell, O. (1997). Nutrient intakes by young children in a prospective randomized trial of a low-saturated fat, low-cholesterol diet. The STRIP Baby Project. Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project for Babies. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 151(2), pp. 181-8.
Lagström H, et al. Nutrient Intakes By Young Children in a Prospective Randomized Trial of a Low-saturated Fat, Low-cholesterol Diet. the STRIP Baby Project. Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project for Babies. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1997;151(2):181-8. PubMed PMID: 9041875.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nutrient intakes by young children in a prospective randomized trial of a low-saturated fat, low-cholesterol diet. The STRIP Baby Project. Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project for Babies. AU - Lagström,H, AU - Jokinen,E, AU - Seppänen,R, AU - Rönnemaa,T, AU - Viikari,J, AU - Välimäki,I, AU - Venetoklis,J, AU - Myyrinmaa,A, AU - Niinikoski,H, AU - Lapinleimu,H, AU - Simell,O, PY - 1997/2/1/pubmed PY - 1997/2/1/medline PY - 1997/2/1/entrez SP - 181 EP - 8 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 151 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of individualized and repeatedly given dietary counseling on fat intake and nutrient intake of children aged 8 months to 4 years. DESIGN: Prospective randomized clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: Children (N = 1062) from 1054 families were randomized to an intervention (n = 540) or a control (n = 522) group when each child participant was 6 months old. INTERVENTIONS: The children in the intervention group were counseled to reduce their intake of saturated fat and cholesterol but to ensure their adequate energy intake. Dietary issues were discussed with the families of the children in the control group only briefly according to the current practice of well-baby clinics. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Food consumption was evaluated by using 3- and 4-day food records that were kept at 5- to 12-month intervals, and nutrient intakes were analyzed with a Micro Nutrica computer program (Social Insurance Institution, Turku, Finland). RESULTS: The intake of fat (29% of the energy intake) and cholesterol (70 mg) showed no differences between the groups of children at 8 months of age. The fat intake in the children in the intervention group was then continuously 2% of the energy intake below that of the children in the control group (P < .001). After the age of 13 months, the cholesterol intake of the children in the control group exceeded that of the children in the intervention group by 20 mg (P < .001). The children in the intervention group consumed 3% (of the energy intake) less saturated (P < .001) and 1% (of the energy intake) more polyunsaturated fats (P < .001) than did the children in the control group at age 13 months and older. The carbohydrate intake was slightly higher in the children in the intervention group than in the children in the control group. Intakes of vitamins, minerals, and trace elements showed no differences between the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: The intakes of fat by the children in the intervention and control groups were markedly below values that were recommended for the first 2 years of life. Despite the low intake of fat, the intake of other nutrients fulfilled current recommendations, except for vitamin D and iron. Individualized dietary counseling that led to clear changes in the type of fat intake had a minimal effect on vitamin or mineral intakes. SN - 1072-4710 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9041875/Nutrient_intakes_by_young_children_in_a_prospective_randomized_trial_of_a_low_saturated_fat_low_cholesterol_diet__The_STRIP_Baby_Project__Special_Turku_Coronary_Risk_Factor_Intervention_Project_for_Babies_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/vol/151/pg/181 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -