Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Substance abuse and cognitive functioning in schizophrenia.
J Psychiatry Neurosci. 1997 Mar; 22(2):99-104.JP

Abstract

Individuals with schizophrenia have an increased vulnerability to abuse drugs or alcohol. This vulnerability can interfere with the course and treatment of the disorder and may also have a detrimental effect on already compromised cognitive functioning. This study has a matched, cross-sectional design and compares the social and cognitive functioning and the symptoms of 33 schizophrenia subjects who abuse substances with 33 nonabusing schizophrenia subjects. Subjects were matched on sex, age, and education variables and were all outpatients. Measures of social functioning and quality of life were used. Assessment of cognitive functioning included measures of verbal ability, attention, executive functioning, and verbal and visual memory. Substance-abusing subjects had significantly lower quality of life. There were no other differences between the 2 groups. Several explanations are offered for the lack of observed differences in cognitive functioning.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9074303

Citation

Addington, J, and D Addington. "Substance Abuse and Cognitive Functioning in Schizophrenia." Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience : JPN, vol. 22, no. 2, 1997, pp. 99-104.
Addington J, Addington D. Substance abuse and cognitive functioning in schizophrenia. J Psychiatry Neurosci. 1997;22(2):99-104.
Addington, J., & Addington, D. (1997). Substance abuse and cognitive functioning in schizophrenia. Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience : JPN, 22(2), 99-104.
Addington J, Addington D. Substance Abuse and Cognitive Functioning in Schizophrenia. J Psychiatry Neurosci. 1997;22(2):99-104. PubMed PMID: 9074303.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Substance abuse and cognitive functioning in schizophrenia. AU - Addington,J, AU - Addington,D, PY - 1997/3/1/pubmed PY - 1997/3/1/medline PY - 1997/3/1/entrez SP - 99 EP - 104 JF - Journal of psychiatry & neuroscience : JPN JO - J Psychiatry Neurosci VL - 22 IS - 2 N2 - Individuals with schizophrenia have an increased vulnerability to abuse drugs or alcohol. This vulnerability can interfere with the course and treatment of the disorder and may also have a detrimental effect on already compromised cognitive functioning. This study has a matched, cross-sectional design and compares the social and cognitive functioning and the symptoms of 33 schizophrenia subjects who abuse substances with 33 nonabusing schizophrenia subjects. Subjects were matched on sex, age, and education variables and were all outpatients. Measures of social functioning and quality of life were used. Assessment of cognitive functioning included measures of verbal ability, attention, executive functioning, and verbal and visual memory. Substance-abusing subjects had significantly lower quality of life. There were no other differences between the 2 groups. Several explanations are offered for the lack of observed differences in cognitive functioning. SN - 1180-4882 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9074303/Substance_abuse_and_cognitive_functioning_in_schizophrenia_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/9074303/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -