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Management of portal hypertension and esophageal varices in alcoholic cirrhosis.
Am Fam Physician. 1997 Apr; 55(5):1851-8, 1861-2.AF

Abstract

Portal hypertension is a frequent consequence of liver disease, especially alcoholic cirrhosis. Unabated elevations in portal pressure may presage an esophageal variceal hemorrhage. Propranolol or isosorbide therapy is effective in the prophylaxis of variceal bleeding. In patients with acute variceal hemorrhage, endoscopic sclerotherapy or ligation is the best initial intervention. Stapled esophageal transection is often effective when endoscopic management fails. Surgical shunts have a lower associated mortality rate when they are performed electively and involve partial shunting of hepatic blood flow. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts are indicated as a salvage procedure or as a bridge to liver transplantation. Ultimately, liver transplantation offers the best survival rate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences AHEC-South Arkansas, El Dorado, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9105210

Citation

Trevillyan, J, and P J. Carroll. "Management of Portal Hypertension and Esophageal Varices in Alcoholic Cirrhosis." American Family Physician, vol. 55, no. 5, 1997, pp. 1851-8, 1861-2.
Trevillyan J, Carroll PJ. Management of portal hypertension and esophageal varices in alcoholic cirrhosis. Am Fam Physician. 1997;55(5):1851-8, 1861-2.
Trevillyan, J., & Carroll, P. J. (1997). Management of portal hypertension and esophageal varices in alcoholic cirrhosis. American Family Physician, 55(5), 1851-8, 1861-2.
Trevillyan J, Carroll PJ. Management of Portal Hypertension and Esophageal Varices in Alcoholic Cirrhosis. Am Fam Physician. 1997;55(5):1851-8, 1861-2. PubMed PMID: 9105210.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Management of portal hypertension and esophageal varices in alcoholic cirrhosis. AU - Trevillyan,J, AU - Carroll,P J, PY - 1997/4/1/pubmed PY - 1997/4/1/medline PY - 1997/4/1/entrez SP - 1851-8, 1861-2 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 55 IS - 5 N2 - Portal hypertension is a frequent consequence of liver disease, especially alcoholic cirrhosis. Unabated elevations in portal pressure may presage an esophageal variceal hemorrhage. Propranolol or isosorbide therapy is effective in the prophylaxis of variceal bleeding. In patients with acute variceal hemorrhage, endoscopic sclerotherapy or ligation is the best initial intervention. Stapled esophageal transection is often effective when endoscopic management fails. Surgical shunts have a lower associated mortality rate when they are performed electively and involve partial shunting of hepatic blood flow. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts are indicated as a salvage procedure or as a bridge to liver transplantation. Ultimately, liver transplantation offers the best survival rate. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9105210/Management_of_portal_hypertension_and_esophageal_varices_in_alcoholic_cirrhosis_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/5881 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -