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Garlic: its anticarcinogenic and antitumorigenic properties.

Abstract

Overall, several investigations indicate that garlic and its organic allyl sulfur components inhibit the cancer process. Furthermore, these studies reveal that the benefits of garlic are not limited to a specific species, a particular tissue, or a specific carcinogen. Finally, odor is not a prerequisite for the protection provided by garlic against the initiation of chemical carcinogenesis. Although the water-soluble compound S-allyl cysteine is effective in reducing the risk of chemically induced tumors in experimental animals, it has no effect on established tumors. However, oil-soluble compounds such as diallyl disulfide are effective in reducing the proliferation of neoplasms. Although the evidence supports the benefits of garlic, additional evidence is needed to determine the quantity needed by humans to minimize cancer risk.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Nutrition Department, Pennsylvania State University, University Park 16802, USA.

    Source

    Nutrition reviews 54:11 Pt 2 1996 Nov pg S82-6

    MeSH

    Anticarcinogenic Agents
    Antineoplastic Agents
    Cell Division
    Diet
    Garlic
    Humans
    Neoplasms
    Plants, Medicinal

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    9110580

    Citation

    Milner, J A.. "Garlic: Its Anticarcinogenic and Antitumorigenic Properties." Nutrition Reviews, vol. 54, no. 11 Pt 2, 1996, pp. S82-6.
    Milner JA. Garlic: its anticarcinogenic and antitumorigenic properties. Nutr Rev. 1996;54(11 Pt 2):S82-6.
    Milner, J. A. (1996). Garlic: its anticarcinogenic and antitumorigenic properties. Nutrition Reviews, 54(11 Pt 2), pp. S82-6.
    Milner JA. Garlic: Its Anticarcinogenic and Antitumorigenic Properties. Nutr Rev. 1996;54(11 Pt 2):S82-6. PubMed PMID: 9110580.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Garlic: its anticarcinogenic and antitumorigenic properties. A1 - Milner,J A, PY - 1996/11/1/pubmed PY - 1996/11/1/medline PY - 1996/11/1/entrez SP - S82 EP - 6 JF - Nutrition reviews JO - Nutr. Rev. VL - 54 IS - 11 Pt 2 N2 - Overall, several investigations indicate that garlic and its organic allyl sulfur components inhibit the cancer process. Furthermore, these studies reveal that the benefits of garlic are not limited to a specific species, a particular tissue, or a specific carcinogen. Finally, odor is not a prerequisite for the protection provided by garlic against the initiation of chemical carcinogenesis. Although the water-soluble compound S-allyl cysteine is effective in reducing the risk of chemically induced tumors in experimental animals, it has no effect on established tumors. However, oil-soluble compounds such as diallyl disulfide are effective in reducing the proliferation of neoplasms. Although the evidence supports the benefits of garlic, additional evidence is needed to determine the quantity needed by humans to minimize cancer risk. SN - 0029-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9110580/Garlic:_its_anticarcinogenic_and_antitumorigenic_properties_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/nutritionreviews/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1753-4887.1996.tb03823.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -