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Thermal responses and physiological strain in men wearing impermeable and semipermeable protective clothing in the cold.
Ergonomics. 1997 Feb; 40(2):141-50.E

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of long term cold exposure on thermal responses and physical performance in men while wearing nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) protective clothing. Six healthy men performed 60 min work/60 min rest cycles during 8 hours at an ambient temperature of -10 degrees C. Work was performed by stepping on a 20 cm high bench 15 times.min-1. Subjects were tested while wearing two different types of NBC clothing: impermeable rubber suit (IP) or semipermeable charcoal impregnated suit (SP) with cold weather underwear layers, as well as rubber gloves, boots and a full-face mask. During the tests oxygen consumption (VO2), rectal (Tre) and skin temperatures and sweat production were measured. Rectal and skin temperatures and body heat content followed the work/rest cycles in both types of NBC clothing. T(re) averaged 37.1 +/- 0.04 and 37.3 +/- 0.1 degrees C for IP and SP (NS), respectively. On average, mean skin temperature (Tsk) was 28.6 +/- 0.2 and 29.7 +/- 0.2 degrees C for IP and SP (p < 0.01), respectively. Finger skin temperature decreased rapidly to below 10 degrees C in both ensembles during the rest periods. During work the finger rewarming rate was 0.49 +/- 0.06 and 0.70 +/- 0.02 degree C.min-1 for IP and SP (p < 0.01), respectively. Decrease in body heat storage (S) during cold exposure was smaller in SP than in IP and S was restored to the level of -0.6 +/- 0.3 and -3.0 +/- 0.6 kJ.kg-1 in SP and IP (p < 0.01), respectively, during the work. Work load, according to VO2 measurements, was 1.5 +/- 0.1 and 1.3 +/- 0.11.min-1 for IP and SP (p < 0.05), respectively. Furthermore, during rest VO2 was 30% (p < 0.001) higher in IP than in SP. In conclusion, both types of NBC protective clothing could be used for long periods in cold conditions at a moderate work load without marked whole body heat debt or heat load. However, peripheral parts of the body experienced a rapid and severe cooling during the rest periods. The semipermeable suit enabled higher body heat storage and faster rewarming of extremities during work than the impermeable suit.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Oulu Regional Institute of Occupational Health, Laboratory of Physiology, Finland.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9118932

Citation

Rissanen, S, and H Rintamäki. "Thermal Responses and Physiological Strain in Men Wearing Impermeable and Semipermeable Protective Clothing in the Cold." Ergonomics, vol. 40, no. 2, 1997, pp. 141-50.
Rissanen S, Rintamäki H. Thermal responses and physiological strain in men wearing impermeable and semipermeable protective clothing in the cold. Ergonomics. 1997;40(2):141-50.
Rissanen, S., & Rintamäki, H. (1997). Thermal responses and physiological strain in men wearing impermeable and semipermeable protective clothing in the cold. Ergonomics, 40(2), 141-50.
Rissanen S, Rintamäki H. Thermal Responses and Physiological Strain in Men Wearing Impermeable and Semipermeable Protective Clothing in the Cold. Ergonomics. 1997;40(2):141-50. PubMed PMID: 9118932.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thermal responses and physiological strain in men wearing impermeable and semipermeable protective clothing in the cold. AU - Rissanen,S, AU - Rintamäki,H, PY - 1997/2/1/pubmed PY - 1997/2/1/medline PY - 1997/2/1/entrez SP - 141 EP - 50 JF - Ergonomics JO - Ergonomics VL - 40 IS - 2 N2 - The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of long term cold exposure on thermal responses and physical performance in men while wearing nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) protective clothing. Six healthy men performed 60 min work/60 min rest cycles during 8 hours at an ambient temperature of -10 degrees C. Work was performed by stepping on a 20 cm high bench 15 times.min-1. Subjects were tested while wearing two different types of NBC clothing: impermeable rubber suit (IP) or semipermeable charcoal impregnated suit (SP) with cold weather underwear layers, as well as rubber gloves, boots and a full-face mask. During the tests oxygen consumption (VO2), rectal (Tre) and skin temperatures and sweat production were measured. Rectal and skin temperatures and body heat content followed the work/rest cycles in both types of NBC clothing. T(re) averaged 37.1 +/- 0.04 and 37.3 +/- 0.1 degrees C for IP and SP (NS), respectively. On average, mean skin temperature (Tsk) was 28.6 +/- 0.2 and 29.7 +/- 0.2 degrees C for IP and SP (p < 0.01), respectively. Finger skin temperature decreased rapidly to below 10 degrees C in both ensembles during the rest periods. During work the finger rewarming rate was 0.49 +/- 0.06 and 0.70 +/- 0.02 degree C.min-1 for IP and SP (p < 0.01), respectively. Decrease in body heat storage (S) during cold exposure was smaller in SP than in IP and S was restored to the level of -0.6 +/- 0.3 and -3.0 +/- 0.6 kJ.kg-1 in SP and IP (p < 0.01), respectively, during the work. Work load, according to VO2 measurements, was 1.5 +/- 0.1 and 1.3 +/- 0.11.min-1 for IP and SP (p < 0.05), respectively. Furthermore, during rest VO2 was 30% (p < 0.001) higher in IP than in SP. In conclusion, both types of NBC protective clothing could be used for long periods in cold conditions at a moderate work load without marked whole body heat debt or heat load. However, peripheral parts of the body experienced a rapid and severe cooling during the rest periods. The semipermeable suit enabled higher body heat storage and faster rewarming of extremities during work than the impermeable suit. SN - 0014-0139 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9118932/Thermal_responses_and_physiological_strain_in_men_wearing_impermeable_and_semipermeable_protective_clothing_in_the_cold_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/001401397188260 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -