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Carbohydrate-electrolyte solution effects on physical performance of military tasks.
Aviat Space Environ Med 1997; 68(5):384-91AS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Physical performance of military tasks can deteriorate during field training.

HYPOTHESIS

Drinking a carbohydrate-electrolyte (CHO-E) beverage during military relevant training would improve fluid and caloric intake, and better sustain physical performance.

METHODS

Some 27 volunteers restricted to approximately 2600 kcal.d-1 were randomly assigned to one of three groups: CHO-E, placebo, or water. Fluid intake was ad libitum. The volunteers completed 3 d of field training in hot humid conditions (30 degrees C, 60% rh). Training days 1 and 2 each included a 16-21 km march over hilly terrain, marksmanship training, and 2 h of rock climbing. Day 3 included a 14.5 km march followed by marksmanship tests, a timed rock climb and a 0.7 km uphill (21% grade) run.

RESULTS

The CHO-E beverage provided an additional approximately 2800 kcal (p < 0.05) for the 3 d of training. There were no differences (ANOVA, p > 0.05) between the groups absolute or changes from pre-training values for fluid intake, body weight, climb time, run time, marksmanship, or mood. Those drinking CHO-E were, however, more likely to maintain uphill run performance after training (chi 2 = 7.2; p < 0.05) and more likely to maintain both uphill run and marksmanship ability (chi 2 = 17.2; p < 0.05). There was also an inverse relationship between caloric intake and deterioration of uphill run performance (r = -0.75; p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Persons drinking CHO-E or practicing good food discipline are more likely to sustain physical performance than those eating only a portion of their food. CHO-E provides an accessible source of calories which can be advantageous when limited food is available or inadaquate food consumption is likely.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division, USARIEM, Natick, MA 01760, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9143747

Citation

Montain, S J., et al. "Carbohydrate-electrolyte Solution Effects On Physical Performance of Military Tasks." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 68, no. 5, 1997, pp. 384-91.
Montain SJ, Shippee RL, Tharion WJ. Carbohydrate-electrolyte solution effects on physical performance of military tasks. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1997;68(5):384-91.
Montain, S. J., Shippee, R. L., & Tharion, W. J. (1997). Carbohydrate-electrolyte solution effects on physical performance of military tasks. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 68(5), pp. 384-91.
Montain SJ, Shippee RL, Tharion WJ. Carbohydrate-electrolyte Solution Effects On Physical Performance of Military Tasks. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1997;68(5):384-91. PubMed PMID: 9143747.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Carbohydrate-electrolyte solution effects on physical performance of military tasks. AU - Montain,S J, AU - Shippee,R L, AU - Tharion,W J, PY - 1997/5/1/pubmed PY - 1997/5/1/medline PY - 1997/5/1/entrez SP - 384 EP - 91 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 68 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Physical performance of military tasks can deteriorate during field training. HYPOTHESIS: Drinking a carbohydrate-electrolyte (CHO-E) beverage during military relevant training would improve fluid and caloric intake, and better sustain physical performance. METHODS: Some 27 volunteers restricted to approximately 2600 kcal.d-1 were randomly assigned to one of three groups: CHO-E, placebo, or water. Fluid intake was ad libitum. The volunteers completed 3 d of field training in hot humid conditions (30 degrees C, 60% rh). Training days 1 and 2 each included a 16-21 km march over hilly terrain, marksmanship training, and 2 h of rock climbing. Day 3 included a 14.5 km march followed by marksmanship tests, a timed rock climb and a 0.7 km uphill (21% grade) run. RESULTS: The CHO-E beverage provided an additional approximately 2800 kcal (p < 0.05) for the 3 d of training. There were no differences (ANOVA, p > 0.05) between the groups absolute or changes from pre-training values for fluid intake, body weight, climb time, run time, marksmanship, or mood. Those drinking CHO-E were, however, more likely to maintain uphill run performance after training (chi 2 = 7.2; p < 0.05) and more likely to maintain both uphill run and marksmanship ability (chi 2 = 17.2; p < 0.05). There was also an inverse relationship between caloric intake and deterioration of uphill run performance (r = -0.75; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Persons drinking CHO-E or practicing good food discipline are more likely to sustain physical performance than those eating only a portion of their food. CHO-E provides an accessible source of calories which can be advantageous when limited food is available or inadaquate food consumption is likely. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9143747/Carbohydrate_electrolyte_solution_effects_on_physical_performance_of_military_tasks_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/carbohydrates.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -