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Calretinin in the cat retina: colocalizations with other calcium-binding proteins, GABA and glycine.
Vis Neurosci 1997 Mar-Apr; 14(2):311-22VN

Abstract

Immunocytochemical techniques were used to determine the distribution of the calcium-binding protein calretinin in the cat retina. Comparisons were made with parvalbumin and calbindin as well as with the inhibitory neurotransmitters GABA and glycine. Calretinin immunoreactivity was seen in horizontal cells and multiple subpopulations of amacrine and ganglion cells. Cone outer segments were also stained. Calbindin immunoreactivity was present in cone photoreceptors, horizontal cells, at least two subtypes of cone bipolar cell, numerous amacrine cells, and cells residing in the ganglion cell layer. Heavy staining for parvalbumin was found in both A- and B-type horizontal cells, distinct subpopulations of amacrine and ganglion cells, and a small population of cone photoreceptor cells. To confirm the identity of cone photoreceptors, comparisons were made with retinas stained for opsins specific for red/green or blue cones (Szél et al., 1986). The localization of parvalbumin corresponded with that of blue-type cones only whereas calretinin and calbindin staining showed the same distribution as both red/green and blue cones. Double-label immunofluorescence studies revealed colocalization of all three of the calcium-binding proteins in a number of neurons including horizontal cells and AII amacrine cells. To assess a possible transmitter-specific relationship for calretinin, double-label studies were carried out with GABA and glycine. However, the staining patterns for each of these inhibitory amino acids differed substantially from that of calretinin. The possibility remains that calretinin and other calcium-binding proteins may play a role in neurotransmission through interactions with receptors or second-messenger agents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9147483

Citation

Goebel, D J., and R G. Pourcho. "Calretinin in the Cat Retina: Colocalizations With Other Calcium-binding Proteins, GABA and Glycine." Visual Neuroscience, vol. 14, no. 2, 1997, pp. 311-22.
Goebel DJ, Pourcho RG. Calretinin in the cat retina: colocalizations with other calcium-binding proteins, GABA and glycine. Vis Neurosci. 1997;14(2):311-22.
Goebel, D. J., & Pourcho, R. G. (1997). Calretinin in the cat retina: colocalizations with other calcium-binding proteins, GABA and glycine. Visual Neuroscience, 14(2), pp. 311-22.
Goebel DJ, Pourcho RG. Calretinin in the Cat Retina: Colocalizations With Other Calcium-binding Proteins, GABA and Glycine. Vis Neurosci. 1997;14(2):311-22. PubMed PMID: 9147483.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Calretinin in the cat retina: colocalizations with other calcium-binding proteins, GABA and glycine. AU - Goebel,D J, AU - Pourcho,R G, PY - 1997/3/1/pubmed PY - 1997/3/1/medline PY - 1997/3/1/entrez SP - 311 EP - 22 JF - Visual neuroscience JO - Vis. Neurosci. VL - 14 IS - 2 N2 - Immunocytochemical techniques were used to determine the distribution of the calcium-binding protein calretinin in the cat retina. Comparisons were made with parvalbumin and calbindin as well as with the inhibitory neurotransmitters GABA and glycine. Calretinin immunoreactivity was seen in horizontal cells and multiple subpopulations of amacrine and ganglion cells. Cone outer segments were also stained. Calbindin immunoreactivity was present in cone photoreceptors, horizontal cells, at least two subtypes of cone bipolar cell, numerous amacrine cells, and cells residing in the ganglion cell layer. Heavy staining for parvalbumin was found in both A- and B-type horizontal cells, distinct subpopulations of amacrine and ganglion cells, and a small population of cone photoreceptor cells. To confirm the identity of cone photoreceptors, comparisons were made with retinas stained for opsins specific for red/green or blue cones (Szél et al., 1986). The localization of parvalbumin corresponded with that of blue-type cones only whereas calretinin and calbindin staining showed the same distribution as both red/green and blue cones. Double-label immunofluorescence studies revealed colocalization of all three of the calcium-binding proteins in a number of neurons including horizontal cells and AII amacrine cells. To assess a possible transmitter-specific relationship for calretinin, double-label studies were carried out with GABA and glycine. However, the staining patterns for each of these inhibitory amino acids differed substantially from that of calretinin. The possibility remains that calretinin and other calcium-binding proteins may play a role in neurotransmission through interactions with receptors or second-messenger agents. SN - 0952-5238 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9147483/Calretinin_in_the_cat_retina:_colocalizations_with_other_calcium_binding_proteins_GABA_and_glycine_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -