Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Pica: are you hungry for the facts?
Conn Med 1997; 61(4):207-9CM

Abstract

Pica, the persistent and compulsive ingestion of particular food items or nonnutritive substances, has been associated with iron deficiency, zinc deficiency, geophagia, mental deficiency, developmental delay, and a family history of pica. Nutritional, sensory physiologic, psychosocial, and cultural theories have been advanced to explain this phenomenon, but the etiology of pica is poorly understood. Pica, secondary to iron deficiency, is relatively common and remits after iron therapy. Complications of pica include abdominal problems (sometimes necessitating surgery), lead poisoning, hypokalemia, hyperkalemia, mercury poisoning, phosphorus intoxication, and dental injury. Pica is an underdiagnosed problem that can be caused by a variety of disorders and can lead to serious complications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9149482

Citation

Federman, D G., et al. "Pica: Are You Hungry for the Facts?" Connecticut Medicine, vol. 61, no. 4, 1997, pp. 207-9.
Federman DG, Kirsner RS, Federman GS. Pica: are you hungry for the facts? Conn Med. 1997;61(4):207-9.
Federman, D. G., Kirsner, R. S., & Federman, G. S. (1997). Pica: are you hungry for the facts? Connecticut Medicine, 61(4), pp. 207-9.
Federman DG, Kirsner RS, Federman GS. Pica: Are You Hungry for the Facts. Conn Med. 1997;61(4):207-9. PubMed PMID: 9149482.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pica: are you hungry for the facts? AU - Federman,D G, AU - Kirsner,R S, AU - Federman,G S, PY - 1997/4/1/pubmed PY - 1997/4/1/medline PY - 1997/4/1/entrez SP - 207 EP - 9 JF - Connecticut medicine JO - Conn Med VL - 61 IS - 4 N2 - Pica, the persistent and compulsive ingestion of particular food items or nonnutritive substances, has been associated with iron deficiency, zinc deficiency, geophagia, mental deficiency, developmental delay, and a family history of pica. Nutritional, sensory physiologic, psychosocial, and cultural theories have been advanced to explain this phenomenon, but the etiology of pica is poorly understood. Pica, secondary to iron deficiency, is relatively common and remits after iron therapy. Complications of pica include abdominal problems (sometimes necessitating surgery), lead poisoning, hypokalemia, hyperkalemia, mercury poisoning, phosphorus intoxication, and dental injury. Pica is an underdiagnosed problem that can be caused by a variety of disorders and can lead to serious complications. SN - 0010-6178 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9149482/Pica:_are_you_hungry_for_the_facts DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -