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Effect of vitamin K1 supplementation on vitamin K status in cystic fibrosis patients.
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1997; 24(5):512-7JP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Patients with cystic fibrosis are at risk for impaired vitamin K status due to fat malabsorption from pancreatic insufficiency. This study was designed to assess vitamin K status and measure the effect of vitamin K1 supplementation in cystic fibrosis patients.

METHODS

Eighteen outpatients participated in a crossover study to determine the effect of vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) supplementation. After obtaining initial data, each subject was randomly assigned to either a 4-week study treatment of 5 mg oral vitamin K1 supplementation per week, or no supplementation and then crossed over to the other treatment for a second 4 week period. Plasma, serum and urine samples were collected and analyzed pre-study and at the end of each study period.

RESULTS

The mean concentration of plasma vitamin K1 for the supplemented group was significantly higher than the unsupplemented group, [0.34 nmol/L and 0.21 nmol/L, respectively (p < 0.05)]. The percent of undercarboxylated osteocalcin increased on supplementation from 17% to 31%, (p < 0.005). Prothrombin induced in vitamin K absence (PIVKA-II) increased on supplementation from 5 ng/mL to 22 ng/mL, (p < 0.005). The ratio of urinary gamma-carboxyglutamic acid/creatinine was similar for both study periods.

CONCLUSIONS

In contrast to other studies in cystic fibrosis, this study demonstrated a need for vitamin K1 supplementation. The carboxylation state of osteocalcin and PIVKA-II were the most sensitive indices of changes in vitamin K1 status. Although the 5 mg vitamin K1/week dose improved these vitamin K parameters, normal levels were not achieved.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Children's National Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Washington DC 20010, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9161943

Citation

Beker, L T., et al. "Effect of Vitamin K1 Supplementation On Vitamin K Status in Cystic Fibrosis Patients." Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, vol. 24, no. 5, 1997, pp. 512-7.
Beker LT, Ahrens RA, Fink RJ, et al. Effect of vitamin K1 supplementation on vitamin K status in cystic fibrosis patients. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1997;24(5):512-7.
Beker, L. T., Ahrens, R. A., Fink, R. J., O'Brien, M. E., Davidson, K. W., Sokoll, L. J., & Sadowski, J. A. (1997). Effect of vitamin K1 supplementation on vitamin K status in cystic fibrosis patients. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 24(5), pp. 512-7.
Beker LT, et al. Effect of Vitamin K1 Supplementation On Vitamin K Status in Cystic Fibrosis Patients. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1997;24(5):512-7. PubMed PMID: 9161943.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of vitamin K1 supplementation on vitamin K status in cystic fibrosis patients. AU - Beker,L T, AU - Ahrens,R A, AU - Fink,R J, AU - O'Brien,M E, AU - Davidson,K W, AU - Sokoll,L J, AU - Sadowski,J A, PY - 1997/5/1/pubmed PY - 1997/5/1/medline PY - 1997/5/1/entrez SP - 512 EP - 7 JF - Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition JO - J. Pediatr. Gastroenterol. Nutr. VL - 24 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Patients with cystic fibrosis are at risk for impaired vitamin K status due to fat malabsorption from pancreatic insufficiency. This study was designed to assess vitamin K status and measure the effect of vitamin K1 supplementation in cystic fibrosis patients. METHODS: Eighteen outpatients participated in a crossover study to determine the effect of vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) supplementation. After obtaining initial data, each subject was randomly assigned to either a 4-week study treatment of 5 mg oral vitamin K1 supplementation per week, or no supplementation and then crossed over to the other treatment for a second 4 week period. Plasma, serum and urine samples were collected and analyzed pre-study and at the end of each study period. RESULTS: The mean concentration of plasma vitamin K1 for the supplemented group was significantly higher than the unsupplemented group, [0.34 nmol/L and 0.21 nmol/L, respectively (p < 0.05)]. The percent of undercarboxylated osteocalcin increased on supplementation from 17% to 31%, (p < 0.005). Prothrombin induced in vitamin K absence (PIVKA-II) increased on supplementation from 5 ng/mL to 22 ng/mL, (p < 0.005). The ratio of urinary gamma-carboxyglutamic acid/creatinine was similar for both study periods. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to other studies in cystic fibrosis, this study demonstrated a need for vitamin K1 supplementation. The carboxylation state of osteocalcin and PIVKA-II were the most sensitive indices of changes in vitamin K1 status. Although the 5 mg vitamin K1/week dose improved these vitamin K parameters, normal levels were not achieved. SN - 0277-2116 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9161943/Effect_of_vitamin_K1_supplementation_on_vitamin_K_status_in_cystic_fibrosis_patients_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=9161943 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -