Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effect of vitamin K1 supplementation on vitamin K status in cystic fibrosis patients.
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1997 May; 24(5):512-7.JP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Patients with cystic fibrosis are at risk for impaired vitamin K status due to fat malabsorption from pancreatic insufficiency. This study was designed to assess vitamin K status and measure the effect of vitamin K1 supplementation in cystic fibrosis patients.

METHODS

Eighteen outpatients participated in a crossover study to determine the effect of vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) supplementation. After obtaining initial data, each subject was randomly assigned to either a 4-week study treatment of 5 mg oral vitamin K1 supplementation per week, or no supplementation and then crossed over to the other treatment for a second 4 week period. Plasma, serum and urine samples were collected and analyzed pre-study and at the end of each study period.

RESULTS

The mean concentration of plasma vitamin K1 for the supplemented group was significantly higher than the unsupplemented group, [0.34 nmol/L and 0.21 nmol/L, respectively (p < 0.05)]. The percent of undercarboxylated osteocalcin increased on supplementation from 17% to 31%, (p < 0.005). Prothrombin induced in vitamin K absence (PIVKA-II) increased on supplementation from 5 ng/mL to 22 ng/mL, (p < 0.005). The ratio of urinary gamma-carboxyglutamic acid/creatinine was similar for both study periods.

CONCLUSIONS

In contrast to other studies in cystic fibrosis, this study demonstrated a need for vitamin K1 supplementation. The carboxylation state of osteocalcin and PIVKA-II were the most sensitive indices of changes in vitamin K1 status. Although the 5 mg vitamin K1/week dose improved these vitamin K parameters, normal levels were not achieved.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Children's National Medical Center, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Washington DC 20010, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9161943

Citation

Beker, L T., et al. "Effect of Vitamin K1 Supplementation On Vitamin K Status in Cystic Fibrosis Patients." Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, vol. 24, no. 5, 1997, pp. 512-7.
Beker LT, Ahrens RA, Fink RJ, et al. Effect of vitamin K1 supplementation on vitamin K status in cystic fibrosis patients. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1997;24(5):512-7.
Beker, L. T., Ahrens, R. A., Fink, R. J., O'Brien, M. E., Davidson, K. W., Sokoll, L. J., & Sadowski, J. A. (1997). Effect of vitamin K1 supplementation on vitamin K status in cystic fibrosis patients. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 24(5), 512-7.
Beker LT, et al. Effect of Vitamin K1 Supplementation On Vitamin K Status in Cystic Fibrosis Patients. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1997;24(5):512-7. PubMed PMID: 9161943.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of vitamin K1 supplementation on vitamin K status in cystic fibrosis patients. AU - Beker,L T, AU - Ahrens,R A, AU - Fink,R J, AU - O'Brien,M E, AU - Davidson,K W, AU - Sokoll,L J, AU - Sadowski,J A, PY - 1997/5/1/pubmed PY - 1997/5/1/medline PY - 1997/5/1/entrez SP - 512 EP - 7 JF - Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition JO - J. Pediatr. Gastroenterol. Nutr. VL - 24 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Patients with cystic fibrosis are at risk for impaired vitamin K status due to fat malabsorption from pancreatic insufficiency. This study was designed to assess vitamin K status and measure the effect of vitamin K1 supplementation in cystic fibrosis patients. METHODS: Eighteen outpatients participated in a crossover study to determine the effect of vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) supplementation. After obtaining initial data, each subject was randomly assigned to either a 4-week study treatment of 5 mg oral vitamin K1 supplementation per week, or no supplementation and then crossed over to the other treatment for a second 4 week period. Plasma, serum and urine samples were collected and analyzed pre-study and at the end of each study period. RESULTS: The mean concentration of plasma vitamin K1 for the supplemented group was significantly higher than the unsupplemented group, [0.34 nmol/L and 0.21 nmol/L, respectively (p < 0.05)]. The percent of undercarboxylated osteocalcin increased on supplementation from 17% to 31%, (p < 0.005). Prothrombin induced in vitamin K absence (PIVKA-II) increased on supplementation from 5 ng/mL to 22 ng/mL, (p < 0.005). The ratio of urinary gamma-carboxyglutamic acid/creatinine was similar for both study periods. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to other studies in cystic fibrosis, this study demonstrated a need for vitamin K1 supplementation. The carboxylation state of osteocalcin and PIVKA-II were the most sensitive indices of changes in vitamin K1 status. Although the 5 mg vitamin K1/week dose improved these vitamin K parameters, normal levels were not achieved. SN - 0277-2116 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9161943/Effect_of_vitamin_K1_supplementation_on_vitamin_K_status_in_cystic_fibrosis_patients_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00005176-199705000-00003 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -