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A risk profile of street youth in northern California: implications for gender-specific human immunodeficiency virus prevention.
J Adolesc Health. 1997 May; 20(5):343-53.JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

To assess human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors of street youth and to determine whether risk behaviors differ by gender or housing status.

METHODS

Using systematic street-based sampling in four Northern California cities, we recruited 429 street youth (mean age = 19.2 years). Participants completed a structured interview which was used to assess sexual and drug HIV risk behaviors.

RESULTS

The majority of youth were heterosexual (85%), white (77%), male (68%), and currently without any type of stable housing (75%). Although 60% of the sample had had vaginal sex in the past 30 days, only 44% used a condom the last time they had sex. About one-third (32%) of the sample reported ever injecting drugs, and almost all reported lifetime use of multiple drugs including D-lysergic acid diethylamide (96%), marijuana (90%), alcohol (81%), cocaine (70%), and speed (70%). Compared to males, females were equally likely to use injection and noninjection drugs, but were more likely to be sexually active (P < .001), were more likely to have been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease (P = .005), and were less likely to report consistent condom use (P = .003) or intent to use condoms consistently in the future (P = .005). Compared with those with stable housing, youth who were currently without such housing reported higher rates of injection, and other drug use; females without stable housing were less likely to have used condoms the last time they had vaginal intercourse.

CONCLUSION

The high level of HIV risk behavior in this street-based sample of youth, particularly females and youth without stable housing, suggests an urgent need for gender-specific prevention efforts and an increased range of housing options.

Authors+Show Affiliations

San Francisco Department of Public Health, AIDS Office, CA 94102, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9168381

Citation

Clements, K, et al. "A Risk Profile of Street Youth in Northern California: Implications for Gender-specific Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 20, no. 5, 1997, pp. 343-53.
Clements K, Gleghorn A, Garcia D, et al. A risk profile of street youth in northern California: implications for gender-specific human immunodeficiency virus prevention. J Adolesc Health. 1997;20(5):343-53.
Clements, K., Gleghorn, A., Garcia, D., Katz, M., & Marx, R. (1997). A risk profile of street youth in northern California: implications for gender-specific human immunodeficiency virus prevention. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 20(5), 343-53.
Clements K, et al. A Risk Profile of Street Youth in Northern California: Implications for Gender-specific Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention. J Adolesc Health. 1997;20(5):343-53. PubMed PMID: 9168381.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A risk profile of street youth in northern California: implications for gender-specific human immunodeficiency virus prevention. AU - Clements,K, AU - Gleghorn,A, AU - Garcia,D, AU - Katz,M, AU - Marx,R, PY - 1997/5/1/pubmed PY - 1997/5/1/medline PY - 1997/5/1/entrez SP - 343 EP - 53 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 20 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: To assess human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors of street youth and to determine whether risk behaviors differ by gender or housing status. METHODS: Using systematic street-based sampling in four Northern California cities, we recruited 429 street youth (mean age = 19.2 years). Participants completed a structured interview which was used to assess sexual and drug HIV risk behaviors. RESULTS: The majority of youth were heterosexual (85%), white (77%), male (68%), and currently without any type of stable housing (75%). Although 60% of the sample had had vaginal sex in the past 30 days, only 44% used a condom the last time they had sex. About one-third (32%) of the sample reported ever injecting drugs, and almost all reported lifetime use of multiple drugs including D-lysergic acid diethylamide (96%), marijuana (90%), alcohol (81%), cocaine (70%), and speed (70%). Compared to males, females were equally likely to use injection and noninjection drugs, but were more likely to be sexually active (P < .001), were more likely to have been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease (P = .005), and were less likely to report consistent condom use (P = .003) or intent to use condoms consistently in the future (P = .005). Compared with those with stable housing, youth who were currently without such housing reported higher rates of injection, and other drug use; females without stable housing were less likely to have used condoms the last time they had vaginal intercourse. CONCLUSION: The high level of HIV risk behavior in this street-based sample of youth, particularly females and youth without stable housing, suggests an urgent need for gender-specific prevention efforts and an increased range of housing options. SN - 1054-139X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9168381/A_risk_profile_of_street_youth_in_northern_California:_implications_for_gender_specific_human_immunodeficiency_virus_prevention_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(97)00033-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -