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A double-blind controlled study of gabapentin and baclofen as treatment for acquired nystagmus.
Ann Neurol. 1997 Jun; 41(6):818-25.AN

Abstract

We conducted a double-blind crossover trial comparing gabapentin (up to 900 mg/day) to baclofen (up to 30 mg/day) as therapy for acquired nystagmus in 21 patients. We measured visual acuity and the nystagmus before, and at the end of, 2 weeks on each medication. For a group of 15 patients with acquired pendular nystagmus (APN), visual acuity improved significantly with gabapentin, but not with baclofen. Gabapentin significantly reduced APN median eye speed in all three planes, but baclofen did so only in the vertical plane. In 10 patients with APN, the reduction of nystagmus with gabapentin was substantial and 8 of these elected to continue taking the drug. In 6 patients with downbeat or torsional downbeat nystagmus, changes in median slow-phase eye speed were less consistent with both drugs, either increasing or decreasing, and being dependent on viewing conditions. Only 1 patient showed consistent reduction of median eye speed, and this was achieved by either drug. Our findings suggest that gabapentin may be an effective treatment for many patients with APN and that occasional patients with downbeat nystagmus will respond to gabapentin or baclofen.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9189045

Citation

Averbuch-Heller, L, et al. "A Double-blind Controlled Study of Gabapentin and Baclofen as Treatment for Acquired Nystagmus." Annals of Neurology, vol. 41, no. 6, 1997, pp. 818-25.
Averbuch-Heller L, Tusa RJ, Fuhry L, et al. A double-blind controlled study of gabapentin and baclofen as treatment for acquired nystagmus. Ann Neurol. 1997;41(6):818-25.
Averbuch-Heller, L., Tusa, R. J., Fuhry, L., Rottach, K. G., Ganser, G. L., Heide, W., Büttner, U., & Leigh, R. J. (1997). A double-blind controlled study of gabapentin and baclofen as treatment for acquired nystagmus. Annals of Neurology, 41(6), 818-25.
Averbuch-Heller L, et al. A Double-blind Controlled Study of Gabapentin and Baclofen as Treatment for Acquired Nystagmus. Ann Neurol. 1997;41(6):818-25. PubMed PMID: 9189045.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A double-blind controlled study of gabapentin and baclofen as treatment for acquired nystagmus. AU - Averbuch-Heller,L, AU - Tusa,R J, AU - Fuhry,L, AU - Rottach,K G, AU - Ganser,G L, AU - Heide,W, AU - Büttner,U, AU - Leigh,R J, PY - 1997/6/1/pubmed PY - 1997/6/1/medline PY - 1997/6/1/entrez KW - Non-programmatic SP - 818 EP - 25 JF - Annals of neurology JO - Ann Neurol VL - 41 IS - 6 N2 - We conducted a double-blind crossover trial comparing gabapentin (up to 900 mg/day) to baclofen (up to 30 mg/day) as therapy for acquired nystagmus in 21 patients. We measured visual acuity and the nystagmus before, and at the end of, 2 weeks on each medication. For a group of 15 patients with acquired pendular nystagmus (APN), visual acuity improved significantly with gabapentin, but not with baclofen. Gabapentin significantly reduced APN median eye speed in all three planes, but baclofen did so only in the vertical plane. In 10 patients with APN, the reduction of nystagmus with gabapentin was substantial and 8 of these elected to continue taking the drug. In 6 patients with downbeat or torsional downbeat nystagmus, changes in median slow-phase eye speed were less consistent with both drugs, either increasing or decreasing, and being dependent on viewing conditions. Only 1 patient showed consistent reduction of median eye speed, and this was achieved by either drug. Our findings suggest that gabapentin may be an effective treatment for many patients with APN and that occasional patients with downbeat nystagmus will respond to gabapentin or baclofen. SN - 0364-5134 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9189045/A_double_blind_controlled_study_of_gabapentin_and_baclofen_as_treatment_for_acquired_nystagmus_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0364-5134&date=1997&volume=41&issue=6&spage=818 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -