Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Dietary antioxidants and Parkinson disease. The Rotterdam Study.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate whether high dietary intake of antioxidants decreases the risk of Parkinson disease (PD).

SETTING

The community-based Rotterdam Study, the Netherlands.

DESIGN

The cross-sectional study formed part of a large community-based study in which all participants were individually screened for parkinsonism and were administered a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. The study population consisted of 5342 independently living individuals without dementia between 55 and 95 years of age, including 31 participants with PD (Hoehn-Yahr stages 1-3).

RESULTS

The odds ratio for PD was 0.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2-0.9) per 10-mg daily dietary vitamin E intake, 0.6 (95% CI, 0.3-1.3) per 1-mg beta carotene intake, 0.9 (95% CI, 0.4-1.9) per 100-mg vitamin C intake, and 0.9 (95% CI, 0.7-1.2) per 10-mg flavonoids intake, all adjusted for age, sex, smoking habits, and energy intake. The association with vitamin E intake was dose dependent (P for trend = .03). To assess whether the association was different in participants with more advanced disease, we excluded those with PD who had a Hoehn-Yahr stage of 2.5 or 3. This did not fundamentally alter the results.

CONCLUSION

Our data suggest that a high intake of dietary vitamin E may protect against the occurrence of PD.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Erasmus University Medical School, Rotterdam, The Netherland.

    , , , , ,

    Source

    Archives of neurology 54:6 1997 Jun pg 762-5

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Antioxidants
    Ascorbic Acid
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diet
    Female
    Flavonoids
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Netherlands
    Odds Ratio
    Parkinson Disease, Secondary
    Severity of Illness Index
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Vitamin E
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    9193212

    Citation

    de Rijk, M C., et al. "Dietary Antioxidants and Parkinson Disease. the Rotterdam Study." Archives of Neurology, vol. 54, no. 6, 1997, pp. 762-5.
    de Rijk MC, Breteler MM, den Breeijen JH, et al. Dietary antioxidants and Parkinson disease. The Rotterdam Study. Arch Neurol. 1997;54(6):762-5.
    de Rijk, M. C., Breteler, M. M., den Breeijen, J. H., Launer, L. J., Grobbee, D. E., van der Meché, F. G., & Hofman, A. (1997). Dietary antioxidants and Parkinson disease. The Rotterdam Study. Archives of Neurology, 54(6), pp. 762-5.
    de Rijk MC, et al. Dietary Antioxidants and Parkinson Disease. the Rotterdam Study. Arch Neurol. 1997;54(6):762-5. PubMed PMID: 9193212.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary antioxidants and Parkinson disease. The Rotterdam Study. AU - de Rijk,M C, AU - Breteler,M M, AU - den Breeijen,J H, AU - Launer,L J, AU - Grobbee,D E, AU - van der Meché,F G, AU - Hofman,A, PY - 1997/6/1/pubmed PY - 1997/6/1/medline PY - 1997/6/1/entrez SP - 762 EP - 5 JF - Archives of neurology JO - Arch. Neurol. VL - 54 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether high dietary intake of antioxidants decreases the risk of Parkinson disease (PD). SETTING: The community-based Rotterdam Study, the Netherlands. DESIGN: The cross-sectional study formed part of a large community-based study in which all participants were individually screened for parkinsonism and were administered a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. The study population consisted of 5342 independently living individuals without dementia between 55 and 95 years of age, including 31 participants with PD (Hoehn-Yahr stages 1-3). RESULTS: The odds ratio for PD was 0.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2-0.9) per 10-mg daily dietary vitamin E intake, 0.6 (95% CI, 0.3-1.3) per 1-mg beta carotene intake, 0.9 (95% CI, 0.4-1.9) per 100-mg vitamin C intake, and 0.9 (95% CI, 0.7-1.2) per 10-mg flavonoids intake, all adjusted for age, sex, smoking habits, and energy intake. The association with vitamin E intake was dose dependent (P for trend = .03). To assess whether the association was different in participants with more advanced disease, we excluded those with PD who had a Hoehn-Yahr stage of 2.5 or 3. This did not fundamentally alter the results. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that a high intake of dietary vitamin E may protect against the occurrence of PD. SN - 0003-9942 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9193212/Dietary_antioxidants_and_Parkinson_disease__The_Rotterdam_Study_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/vol/54/pg/762 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -