Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Safety of a fat-reduced diet: the Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC).
Pediatrics. 1997 Jul; 100(1):51-9.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the relationship between energy intake from fat and anthropometric, biochemical, and dietary measures of nutritional adequacy and safety.

DESIGN

Three-year longitudinal study of children participating in a randomized controlled trial; intervention and usual care group data pooled to assess effects of self-reported fat intake; longitudinal regression analyses of measurements at baseline, year 1, and year 3.

PARTICIPANTS

Six hundred sixty-three children (362 boys and 301 girls), 8 to 10 years of age at baseline, with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, who are participants of the Dietary Intervention Study in Children.

MEASURES

Energy intake from fat assessed from three 24-hour recalls at each time point was the independent variable. Outcomes were anthropometric measures (height, weight, body mass index, and sum of skinfolds), nutritional biochemical determinations (serum ferritin, zinc, retinol, albumin, beta-carotene, and vitamin E, red blood cell folate, and hemoglobin), and dietary micronutrients (vitamins A, C, E, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamins B-6, B-12, folate, calcium, iron, zinc, magnesium, and phosphorus).

RESULTS

Lower fat intake was not related to anthropometric measures or serum zinc, retinol, albumin, beta-carotene, or vitamin E. Lower fat intake was related to: 1) higher levels of red blood cell folate and hemoglobin, with a trend toward higher serum ferritin; 2) higher intakes of folate, vitamin C, and vitamin A, with a trend toward higher iron intake; 3) lower intakes of calcium, zinc, magnesium, phosphorus, vitamin B-12, thiamin, niacin, and riboflavin; 4) increased risk of consuming less than two-thirds of the Recommended Dietary Allowances for calcium in girls at baseline, and zinc and vitamin E in boys and girls at all visits.

CONCLUSIONS

Lower fat intakes during puberty are nutritionally adequate for growth and for maintenance of normal levels of nutritional biochemical measures, and are associated with beneficial effects on blood folate and hemoglobin. Although lower fat diets were related to lower self-reported intakes of several nutrients, no adverse effects were observed on blood biochemical measures of nutritional status. Current public health recommendations for moderately lower fat intakes in children during puberty may be followed safely.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Division of Epidemiology and Clinical Applications, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7936, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9200359

Citation

Obarzanek, E, et al. "Safety of a Fat-reduced Diet: the Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC)." Pediatrics, vol. 100, no. 1, 1997, pp. 51-9.
Obarzanek E, Hunsberger SA, Van Horn L, et al. Safety of a fat-reduced diet: the Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC). Pediatrics. 1997;100(1):51-9.
Obarzanek, E., Hunsberger, S. A., Van Horn, L., Hartmuller, V. V., Barton, B. A., Stevens, V. J., Kwiterovich, P. O., Franklin, F. A., Kimm, S. Y., Lasser, N. L., Simons-Morton, D. G., & Lauer, R. M. (1997). Safety of a fat-reduced diet: the Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC). Pediatrics, 100(1), 51-9.
Obarzanek E, et al. Safety of a Fat-reduced Diet: the Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC). Pediatrics. 1997;100(1):51-9. PubMed PMID: 9200359.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Safety of a fat-reduced diet: the Dietary Intervention Study in Children (DISC). AU - Obarzanek,E, AU - Hunsberger,S A, AU - Van Horn,L, AU - Hartmuller,V V, AU - Barton,B A, AU - Stevens,V J, AU - Kwiterovich,P O, AU - Franklin,F A, AU - Kimm,S Y, AU - Lasser,N L, AU - Simons-Morton,D G, AU - Lauer,R M, PY - 1997/7/1/pubmed PY - 1997/7/1/medline PY - 1997/7/1/entrez SP - 51 EP - 9 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 100 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between energy intake from fat and anthropometric, biochemical, and dietary measures of nutritional adequacy and safety. DESIGN: Three-year longitudinal study of children participating in a randomized controlled trial; intervention and usual care group data pooled to assess effects of self-reported fat intake; longitudinal regression analyses of measurements at baseline, year 1, and year 3. PARTICIPANTS: Six hundred sixty-three children (362 boys and 301 girls), 8 to 10 years of age at baseline, with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, who are participants of the Dietary Intervention Study in Children. MEASURES: Energy intake from fat assessed from three 24-hour recalls at each time point was the independent variable. Outcomes were anthropometric measures (height, weight, body mass index, and sum of skinfolds), nutritional biochemical determinations (serum ferritin, zinc, retinol, albumin, beta-carotene, and vitamin E, red blood cell folate, and hemoglobin), and dietary micronutrients (vitamins A, C, E, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamins B-6, B-12, folate, calcium, iron, zinc, magnesium, and phosphorus). RESULTS: Lower fat intake was not related to anthropometric measures or serum zinc, retinol, albumin, beta-carotene, or vitamin E. Lower fat intake was related to: 1) higher levels of red blood cell folate and hemoglobin, with a trend toward higher serum ferritin; 2) higher intakes of folate, vitamin C, and vitamin A, with a trend toward higher iron intake; 3) lower intakes of calcium, zinc, magnesium, phosphorus, vitamin B-12, thiamin, niacin, and riboflavin; 4) increased risk of consuming less than two-thirds of the Recommended Dietary Allowances for calcium in girls at baseline, and zinc and vitamin E in boys and girls at all visits. CONCLUSIONS: Lower fat intakes during puberty are nutritionally adequate for growth and for maintenance of normal levels of nutritional biochemical measures, and are associated with beneficial effects on blood folate and hemoglobin. Although lower fat diets were related to lower self-reported intakes of several nutrients, no adverse effects were observed on blood biochemical measures of nutritional status. Current public health recommendations for moderately lower fat intakes in children during puberty may be followed safely. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9200359/Safety_of_a_fat_reduced_diet:_the_Dietary_Intervention_Study_in_Children__DISC__ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -