Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Supplementation with vitamin C, vitamin E or beta-carotene influences osmotic fragility and oxidative damage of erythrocytes of zinc-deficient rats.
J Nutr 1997; 127(7):1290-6JN

Abstract

Dietary zinc deficiency in rats causes increased osmotic fragility of their erythrocytes. In this study, the influence of supplementary antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E or beta-carotene) on osmotic fragility, oxidative damage and components of the primary defense system of erythrocytes of zinc-deficient rats was investigated. Indicators of hemolysis in vivo were also examined. Five groups of 12 male rats were force-fed a zinc-adequate diet (control rats), a zinc-deficient diet or a zinc-deficient diet enriched with vitamin C, vitamin E or beta-carotene. Compared with the control rats, the rats fed the zinc-deficient diet without supplementary antioxidants had greater red blood cell osmotic fragility, higher concentrations of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and alanine, higher glutathione S-transferase activity, lower concentration of glutathione and activity of glutathione peroxidase as well as lower activity of superoxide dismutase in plasma (P < 0.05). Supplementation with antioxidants generally improved osmotic fragility in zinc-deficient rats without influencing zinc concentration or alkaline phosphatase activity in plasma, indicators of zinc status. At some of the hypotonic saline concentrations tested, vitamin C and beta-carotene significantly affected osmotic fragility. The zinc-deficient rats fed a diet without supplementary antioxidants had significantly higher concentrations of alanine in erythrocytes than the zinc-deficient rats supplemented with vitamin C, vitamin E or beta-carotene and had significantly higher levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in erythrocytes than the rats supplemented with beta-carotene. There was no indication of hemolysis in vivo in rats fed zinc-deficient diets. The results show that supplementary antioxidants decrease osmotic fragility and oxidative damage of erythrocytes in zinc-deficient rats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institut für Ernährungsphysiologie der Technischen Universität München-Weihenstephan, 85350 Freising, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9202082

Citation

Kraus, A, et al. "Supplementation With Vitamin C, Vitamin E or Beta-carotene Influences Osmotic Fragility and Oxidative Damage of Erythrocytes of Zinc-deficient Rats." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 127, no. 7, 1997, pp. 1290-6.
Kraus A, Roth HP, Kirchgessner M. Supplementation with vitamin C, vitamin E or beta-carotene influences osmotic fragility and oxidative damage of erythrocytes of zinc-deficient rats. J Nutr. 1997;127(7):1290-6.
Kraus, A., Roth, H. P., & Kirchgessner, M. (1997). Supplementation with vitamin C, vitamin E or beta-carotene influences osmotic fragility and oxidative damage of erythrocytes of zinc-deficient rats. The Journal of Nutrition, 127(7), pp. 1290-6.
Kraus A, Roth HP, Kirchgessner M. Supplementation With Vitamin C, Vitamin E or Beta-carotene Influences Osmotic Fragility and Oxidative Damage of Erythrocytes of Zinc-deficient Rats. J Nutr. 1997;127(7):1290-6. PubMed PMID: 9202082.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Supplementation with vitamin C, vitamin E or beta-carotene influences osmotic fragility and oxidative damage of erythrocytes of zinc-deficient rats. AU - Kraus,A, AU - Roth,H P, AU - Kirchgessner,M, PY - 1997/7/1/pubmed PY - 1997/7/1/medline PY - 1997/7/1/entrez SP - 1290 EP - 6 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 127 IS - 7 N2 - Dietary zinc deficiency in rats causes increased osmotic fragility of their erythrocytes. In this study, the influence of supplementary antioxidants (vitamin C, vitamin E or beta-carotene) on osmotic fragility, oxidative damage and components of the primary defense system of erythrocytes of zinc-deficient rats was investigated. Indicators of hemolysis in vivo were also examined. Five groups of 12 male rats were force-fed a zinc-adequate diet (control rats), a zinc-deficient diet or a zinc-deficient diet enriched with vitamin C, vitamin E or beta-carotene. Compared with the control rats, the rats fed the zinc-deficient diet without supplementary antioxidants had greater red blood cell osmotic fragility, higher concentrations of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and alanine, higher glutathione S-transferase activity, lower concentration of glutathione and activity of glutathione peroxidase as well as lower activity of superoxide dismutase in plasma (P < 0.05). Supplementation with antioxidants generally improved osmotic fragility in zinc-deficient rats without influencing zinc concentration or alkaline phosphatase activity in plasma, indicators of zinc status. At some of the hypotonic saline concentrations tested, vitamin C and beta-carotene significantly affected osmotic fragility. The zinc-deficient rats fed a diet without supplementary antioxidants had significantly higher concentrations of alanine in erythrocytes than the zinc-deficient rats supplemented with vitamin C, vitamin E or beta-carotene and had significantly higher levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in erythrocytes than the rats supplemented with beta-carotene. There was no indication of hemolysis in vivo in rats fed zinc-deficient diets. The results show that supplementary antioxidants decrease osmotic fragility and oxidative damage of erythrocytes in zinc-deficient rats. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9202082/Supplementation_with_vitamin_C_vitamin_E_or_beta_carotene_influences_osmotic_fragility_and_oxidative_damage_of_erythrocytes_of_zinc_deficient_rats_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/127.7.1290 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -