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Helicobacter pylori infection and genetic polymorphisms for cancer-related genes in gastric carcinogenesis.
Biomed Pharmacother 1997; 51(4):145-9BP

Abstract

The development of gastric cancer is a multistep process that is multi-factorial. An association with the Helicobacter pylori infections, gastric atrophy and gastric cancer has received recent attention. The objective of this study was to elucidate the risk factors for gastric cancer by using molecular epidemiological techniques for genetic susceptibility, gastric atrophy and serum markers including H pylori infection. We used an age- and gender-matched case-control study, where patients with benign gastric lesions were the controls. Low serum pepsinogen I levels (cut-off < 50 ng/mL) and low pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratios (cut-off < 3.0) were significantly associated with the risk of gastric cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 3.53: 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.46-5.09 and OR = 4.73: 3.26-6.88, respectively). However, seropositivity of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody against H pylori (OR = 1.09: 0.74-1.61) was not associated with gastric cancer, even when analyzed by age greater than or less then 50 years. Specific genotypes of the cytochrome p450 2E1 (CYP2E1) RsaI polymorphism and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) M1 gene deletion were determined but were not associated with gastric cancer; however, a Lmyc genetic polymorphism was associated with gastric cancer (OR = 1.55: 1.03-2.34). Therefore, in this Japanese study, atrophic mucosal change, indicated by serum pepsinogen levels, is a possible risk factor for gastric cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

First Department of Surgery, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9207980

Citation

Kato, S, et al. "Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Genetic Polymorphisms for Cancer-related Genes in Gastric Carcinogenesis." Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy = Biomedecine & Pharmacotherapie, vol. 51, no. 4, 1997, pp. 145-9.
Kato S, Onda M, Matsukura N, et al. Helicobacter pylori infection and genetic polymorphisms for cancer-related genes in gastric carcinogenesis. Biomed Pharmacother. 1997;51(4):145-9.
Kato, S., Onda, M., Matsukura, N., Tokunaga, A., Matsuda, N., Yamashita, K., & Shields, P. G. (1997). Helicobacter pylori infection and genetic polymorphisms for cancer-related genes in gastric carcinogenesis. Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy = Biomedecine & Pharmacotherapie, 51(4), pp. 145-9.
Kato S, et al. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Genetic Polymorphisms for Cancer-related Genes in Gastric Carcinogenesis. Biomed Pharmacother. 1997;51(4):145-9. PubMed PMID: 9207980.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Helicobacter pylori infection and genetic polymorphisms for cancer-related genes in gastric carcinogenesis. AU - Kato,S, AU - Onda,M, AU - Matsukura,N, AU - Tokunaga,A, AU - Matsuda,N, AU - Yamashita,K, AU - Shields,P G, PY - 1997/1/1/pubmed PY - 1997/1/1/medline PY - 1997/1/1/entrez SP - 145 EP - 9 JF - Biomedicine & pharmacotherapy = Biomedecine & pharmacotherapie JO - Biomed. Pharmacother. VL - 51 IS - 4 N2 - The development of gastric cancer is a multistep process that is multi-factorial. An association with the Helicobacter pylori infections, gastric atrophy and gastric cancer has received recent attention. The objective of this study was to elucidate the risk factors for gastric cancer by using molecular epidemiological techniques for genetic susceptibility, gastric atrophy and serum markers including H pylori infection. We used an age- and gender-matched case-control study, where patients with benign gastric lesions were the controls. Low serum pepsinogen I levels (cut-off < 50 ng/mL) and low pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratios (cut-off < 3.0) were significantly associated with the risk of gastric cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 3.53: 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.46-5.09 and OR = 4.73: 3.26-6.88, respectively). However, seropositivity of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody against H pylori (OR = 1.09: 0.74-1.61) was not associated with gastric cancer, even when analyzed by age greater than or less then 50 years. Specific genotypes of the cytochrome p450 2E1 (CYP2E1) RsaI polymorphism and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) M1 gene deletion were determined but were not associated with gastric cancer; however, a Lmyc genetic polymorphism was associated with gastric cancer (OR = 1.55: 1.03-2.34). Therefore, in this Japanese study, atrophic mucosal change, indicated by serum pepsinogen levels, is a possible risk factor for gastric cancer. SN - 0753-3322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9207980/Helicobacter_pylori_infection_and_genetic_polymorphisms_for_cancer_related_genes_in_gastric_carcinogenesis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0753332297855813 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -