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A prospective study of alcohol, smoking, caffeine, and the risk of duodenal ulcer in men.
Epidemiology 1997; 8(4):420-4E

Abstract

The associations between smoking, caffeine, and alcohol intake and the risk of duodenal ulcer have rarely been investigated prospectively. We examined these associations in a prospective cohort of 47,806 men, 40-75 years of age, using a mailed baseline questionnaire in 1986, with follow-up every 2 years through 1992. During 6 years of follow-up, we documented 138 newly diagnosed cases of duodenal ulcer. After adjustment for age, energy-adjusted dietary fiber, body mass index, and use of aspirin or other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, current smoking was not associated with a substantial risk of duodenal ulcer [relative risk (RR) = 1.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.61-1.89]. Overall, past smokers were not at increased risk compared with never-smokers (RR = 0.99; 95% CI = 0.69-1.42). Adjusting for other risk factors, alcohol intake (comparing those who drink > 30 gm of alcohol per day to nondrinkers) was not associated with higher risk of duodenal ulcer (RR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.42-1.29). We observed little association between caffeine, caffeine-containing beverages, and decaffeinated coffee and the risk of duodenal ulcer. These results indicate that smoking is not associated with a substantial increase in risk of duodenal ulcer, nor is high intake of alcohol and caffeine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9209857

Citation

Aldoori, W H., et al. "A Prospective Study of Alcohol, Smoking, Caffeine, and the Risk of Duodenal Ulcer in Men." Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), vol. 8, no. 4, 1997, pp. 420-4.
Aldoori WH, Giovannucci EL, Stampfer MJ, et al. A prospective study of alcohol, smoking, caffeine, and the risk of duodenal ulcer in men. Epidemiology. 1997;8(4):420-4.
Aldoori, W. H., Giovannucci, E. L., Stampfer, M. J., Rimm, E. B., Wing, A. L., & Willett, W. C. (1997). A prospective study of alcohol, smoking, caffeine, and the risk of duodenal ulcer in men. Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), 8(4), pp. 420-4.
Aldoori WH, et al. A Prospective Study of Alcohol, Smoking, Caffeine, and the Risk of Duodenal Ulcer in Men. Epidemiology. 1997;8(4):420-4. PubMed PMID: 9209857.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of alcohol, smoking, caffeine, and the risk of duodenal ulcer in men. AU - Aldoori,W H, AU - Giovannucci,E L, AU - Stampfer,M J, AU - Rimm,E B, AU - Wing,A L, AU - Willett,W C, PY - 1997/7/1/pubmed PY - 1997/7/1/medline PY - 1997/7/1/entrez SP - 420 EP - 4 JF - Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) JO - Epidemiology VL - 8 IS - 4 N2 - The associations between smoking, caffeine, and alcohol intake and the risk of duodenal ulcer have rarely been investigated prospectively. We examined these associations in a prospective cohort of 47,806 men, 40-75 years of age, using a mailed baseline questionnaire in 1986, with follow-up every 2 years through 1992. During 6 years of follow-up, we documented 138 newly diagnosed cases of duodenal ulcer. After adjustment for age, energy-adjusted dietary fiber, body mass index, and use of aspirin or other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, current smoking was not associated with a substantial risk of duodenal ulcer [relative risk (RR) = 1.07; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.61-1.89]. Overall, past smokers were not at increased risk compared with never-smokers (RR = 0.99; 95% CI = 0.69-1.42). Adjusting for other risk factors, alcohol intake (comparing those who drink > 30 gm of alcohol per day to nondrinkers) was not associated with higher risk of duodenal ulcer (RR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.42-1.29). We observed little association between caffeine, caffeine-containing beverages, and decaffeinated coffee and the risk of duodenal ulcer. These results indicate that smoking is not associated with a substantial increase in risk of duodenal ulcer, nor is high intake of alcohol and caffeine. SN - 1044-3983 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9209857/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00001648-199707000-00012 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -