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Unusual vestibular and visual input in human dynamic balance as a motion sickness susceptibility test.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1997 Jul; 68(7):588-95.AS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Motion sickness (MS) is commonly thought to arise from a sensory conflict. However, few quantitative methods based on this theory are available to detect MS susceptibility.

HYPOTHESIS

It was asked whether the standardized unusual stimulation of a single sensory channel under quantified dynamic balance conditions in man could elicit a sensory conflict and therefore trigger motion sickness (MS) METHODS: Vestibular and visual channels were stimulated by galvanic current and rotating prismatic glasses, respectively. The moving platform used to create the requirements for dynamic balance conditions was chosen not only to worsen the malaise but also to obtain an objective measurement of the balance consequences of the stimulations.

RESULTS

Both vestibular and visual stimulation, applied separately, elicited MS-like symptoms (in 56% and 73% of subjects, respectively) and stereotyped balance reactions. A relationship was found between subjective MS-like symptoms and objective measurements of dynamic balance performance. Subjects sensitive to unusual vestibular messages differed from the others by a greater increase in the parameters indicating a difficulty of balance whereas subjects sensitive to unusual visual messages were recognized by the strategy they used to balance themselves.

CONCLUSIONS

These results demonstrated that a sensory conflict can trigger MS-like symptoms. We conclude that the measured parameters of a global somatomotor activity, such as the dynamic balance task proposed here, could be useful for objectively detecting subjects predisposed to MS, for training them and testing the efficiency of anti-MS drugs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition, UMR. CNRS 5549 Faculté de Médecine, Toulouse, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9215463

Citation

Séverac Cauquil, A, et al. "Unusual Vestibular and Visual Input in Human Dynamic Balance as a Motion Sickness Susceptibility Test." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 68, no. 7, 1997, pp. 588-95.
Séverac Cauquil A, Dupui P, Costes Salon MC, et al. Unusual vestibular and visual input in human dynamic balance as a motion sickness susceptibility test. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1997;68(7):588-95.
Séverac Cauquil, A., Dupui, P., Costes Salon, M. C., Bessou, P., & Güell, A. (1997). Unusual vestibular and visual input in human dynamic balance as a motion sickness susceptibility test. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 68(7), 588-95.
Séverac Cauquil A, et al. Unusual Vestibular and Visual Input in Human Dynamic Balance as a Motion Sickness Susceptibility Test. Aviat Space Environ Med. 1997;68(7):588-95. PubMed PMID: 9215463.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Unusual vestibular and visual input in human dynamic balance as a motion sickness susceptibility test. AU - Séverac Cauquil,A, AU - Dupui,P, AU - Costes Salon,M C, AU - Bessou,P, AU - Güell,A, PY - 1997/7/1/pubmed PY - 1997/7/1/medline PY - 1997/7/1/entrez SP - 588 EP - 95 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 68 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Motion sickness (MS) is commonly thought to arise from a sensory conflict. However, few quantitative methods based on this theory are available to detect MS susceptibility. HYPOTHESIS: It was asked whether the standardized unusual stimulation of a single sensory channel under quantified dynamic balance conditions in man could elicit a sensory conflict and therefore trigger motion sickness (MS) METHODS: Vestibular and visual channels were stimulated by galvanic current and rotating prismatic glasses, respectively. The moving platform used to create the requirements for dynamic balance conditions was chosen not only to worsen the malaise but also to obtain an objective measurement of the balance consequences of the stimulations. RESULTS: Both vestibular and visual stimulation, applied separately, elicited MS-like symptoms (in 56% and 73% of subjects, respectively) and stereotyped balance reactions. A relationship was found between subjective MS-like symptoms and objective measurements of dynamic balance performance. Subjects sensitive to unusual vestibular messages differed from the others by a greater increase in the parameters indicating a difficulty of balance whereas subjects sensitive to unusual visual messages were recognized by the strategy they used to balance themselves. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrated that a sensory conflict can trigger MS-like symptoms. We conclude that the measured parameters of a global somatomotor activity, such as the dynamic balance task proposed here, could be useful for objectively detecting subjects predisposed to MS, for training them and testing the efficiency of anti-MS drugs. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9215463/Unusual_vestibular_and_visual_input_in_human_dynamic_balance_as_a_motion_sickness_susceptibility_test_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/motionsickness.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -