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Effects of octreotide and a-tocopherol on bacterial translocation in experimental intestinal obstruction: a microbiological, light and electronmicroscopical study.
Hepatogastroenterology. 1997 May-Jun; 44(15):656-63.H

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS

Bacterial translocation induced by intestinal obstruction is suggested to be due to increased intestinal luminal volume, leading to intestinal overgrowth with certain enteric microorganisms and intestinal mucosal damage. If this suggestion is true, maintenance of intestinal mucosal integrity by a cytoprotective agent, a-tocopherol, and inhibition of gastrointestinal secretions by octreotide should decrease the incidence of bacterial translocation and extent of mucosal injury due to intestinal obstruction.

METHODS

Complete intestinal obstruction was created in the distal ileum of male Wistar Albino rats by a single 3-0 silk suture. The animals received subcutaneous injections of 1 ml of physiologic saline (group 1) (PS 24) and 1 ml of saline containing octreotide acetate (100 micrograms/kg) (group 2) (OC 24), at 0, 12 and 24 hours of obstruction. In group 3 (PS 48) and group 4 (OC 48), the rats were treated with subcutaneous physiologic saline (1 ml) and octreotide acetate (100 micrograms/kg), respectively, beginning at the time of obstruction and every 12 hours for 48 hours. The rats in group 5 (Toc 24), were pretreated with intramuscular a-tocopherol 500 mg/kg on day 1 and 8, and underwent laparotomy on day 9. A third dose of a-tocopherol was injected at the time of obstruction on day 9 and no treatment was given thereafter. We tested the incidence of bacterial translocation in systemic organs and circulation and evaluated the histopathological changes in all groups.

RESULTS

Treatment with octreotide acetate was found to be ineffective in reducing the incidence of translocation, with no histopathological improvement. Mucosal damage scores, on the other hand, in the a-tocopherol group were statistically less than those in the octreotide and control groups (p < 0.05). Additionally, a-tocopherol treatment decreased the incidence of organ invasion with translocating bacteria, although this difference did not reach statistical significance.

CONCLUSION

Octreotide acetate treatment in complete intestinal obstruction has no effect on the incidence of bacterial translocation. a-Tocopherol, on the other hand, has a cytoprotective effect on intestinal mucosa in intestinal obstruction which, in turn, is thought to decrease bacterial translocation when used in physiological doses and prophylactically.

Authors+Show Affiliations

4th Department of Surgery, Ankara Numune Hospital.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9222666

Citation

Reis, E, et al. "Effects of Octreotide and A-tocopherol On Bacterial Translocation in Experimental Intestinal Obstruction: a Microbiological, Light and Electronmicroscopical Study." Hepato-gastroenterology, vol. 44, no. 15, 1997, pp. 656-63.
Reis E, Kama NA, Coskun T, et al. Effects of octreotide and a-tocopherol on bacterial translocation in experimental intestinal obstruction: a microbiological, light and electronmicroscopical study. Hepatogastroenterology. 1997;44(15):656-63.
Reis, E., Kama, N. A., Coskun, T., Korkusuz, P., Ors, U., Aksoy, M., & Kulaçoglu, S. (1997). Effects of octreotide and a-tocopherol on bacterial translocation in experimental intestinal obstruction: a microbiological, light and electronmicroscopical study. Hepato-gastroenterology, 44(15), 656-63.
Reis E, et al. Effects of Octreotide and A-tocopherol On Bacterial Translocation in Experimental Intestinal Obstruction: a Microbiological, Light and Electronmicroscopical Study. Hepatogastroenterology. 1997 May-Jun;44(15):656-63. PubMed PMID: 9222666.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of octreotide and a-tocopherol on bacterial translocation in experimental intestinal obstruction: a microbiological, light and electronmicroscopical study. AU - Reis,E, AU - Kama,N A, AU - Coskun,T, AU - Korkusuz,P, AU - Ors,U, AU - Aksoy,M, AU - Kulaçoglu,S, PY - 1997/5/1/pubmed PY - 1997/5/1/medline PY - 1997/5/1/entrez SP - 656 EP - 63 JF - Hepato-gastroenterology JO - Hepatogastroenterology VL - 44 IS - 15 N2 - BACKGROUND/AIMS: Bacterial translocation induced by intestinal obstruction is suggested to be due to increased intestinal luminal volume, leading to intestinal overgrowth with certain enteric microorganisms and intestinal mucosal damage. If this suggestion is true, maintenance of intestinal mucosal integrity by a cytoprotective agent, a-tocopherol, and inhibition of gastrointestinal secretions by octreotide should decrease the incidence of bacterial translocation and extent of mucosal injury due to intestinal obstruction. METHODS: Complete intestinal obstruction was created in the distal ileum of male Wistar Albino rats by a single 3-0 silk suture. The animals received subcutaneous injections of 1 ml of physiologic saline (group 1) (PS 24) and 1 ml of saline containing octreotide acetate (100 micrograms/kg) (group 2) (OC 24), at 0, 12 and 24 hours of obstruction. In group 3 (PS 48) and group 4 (OC 48), the rats were treated with subcutaneous physiologic saline (1 ml) and octreotide acetate (100 micrograms/kg), respectively, beginning at the time of obstruction and every 12 hours for 48 hours. The rats in group 5 (Toc 24), were pretreated with intramuscular a-tocopherol 500 mg/kg on day 1 and 8, and underwent laparotomy on day 9. A third dose of a-tocopherol was injected at the time of obstruction on day 9 and no treatment was given thereafter. We tested the incidence of bacterial translocation in systemic organs and circulation and evaluated the histopathological changes in all groups. RESULTS: Treatment with octreotide acetate was found to be ineffective in reducing the incidence of translocation, with no histopathological improvement. Mucosal damage scores, on the other hand, in the a-tocopherol group were statistically less than those in the octreotide and control groups (p < 0.05). Additionally, a-tocopherol treatment decreased the incidence of organ invasion with translocating bacteria, although this difference did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Octreotide acetate treatment in complete intestinal obstruction has no effect on the incidence of bacterial translocation. a-Tocopherol, on the other hand, has a cytoprotective effect on intestinal mucosa in intestinal obstruction which, in turn, is thought to decrease bacterial translocation when used in physiological doses and prophylactically. SN - 0172-6390 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9222666/Effects_of_octreotide_and_a_tocopherol_on_bacterial_translocation_in_experimental_intestinal_obstruction:_a_microbiological_light_and_electronmicroscopical_study_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/vitamine.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -