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Time course of changes in lactate and free fatty acids after experimental brain injury and relationship to morphologic damage.
Exp Neurol. 1997 Jul; 146(1):240-9.EN

Abstract

Regional levels of lactate and free fatty acids (FFA) were measured after lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury in rats. At 5 min after injury, tissue concentrations of lactate were elevated in the cortices and hippocampi of both ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Whereas lactate levels had returned to normal by about 20 min after injury in the penumbra and contralateral cortices, their elevation persisted in the ipsilateral injured cortex and hippocampus for 24 h after injury. Increases in the levels of FFA (particularly stearic and arachidonic acids) were observed in the cortices and hippocampi of both ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres at 5 min after injury; these levels returned to normal in only the penumbra and contralateral cortices by 20 min after injury. Increased amounts of palmitic and oleic acids were also found only in the injured left cortex and ipsilateral hippocampus at 20 min or later after injury. In general, these elevations persisted for as long as 6 to 24 h in the injured cortex and for 2.5 to 24 h after injury in the ipsilateral hippocampus. Histologic studies revealed a similar extent of damage in the cortex between 5 min and 24 h after injury, whereas damage in the CA3 region of the ipsilateral hippocampus increased during that period. These findings suggest a role for lactic acid and FFA, two secondary injury factors, in neuronal cell loss after brain injury.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center, Lexington, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9225757

Citation

Dhillon, H S., et al. "Time Course of Changes in Lactate and Free Fatty Acids After Experimental Brain Injury and Relationship to Morphologic Damage." Experimental Neurology, vol. 146, no. 1, 1997, pp. 240-9.
Dhillon HS, Dose JM, Scheff SW, et al. Time course of changes in lactate and free fatty acids after experimental brain injury and relationship to morphologic damage. Exp Neurol. 1997;146(1):240-9.
Dhillon, H. S., Dose, J. M., Scheff, S. W., & Prasad, M. R. (1997). Time course of changes in lactate and free fatty acids after experimental brain injury and relationship to morphologic damage. Experimental Neurology, 146(1), 240-9.
Dhillon HS, et al. Time Course of Changes in Lactate and Free Fatty Acids After Experimental Brain Injury and Relationship to Morphologic Damage. Exp Neurol. 1997;146(1):240-9. PubMed PMID: 9225757.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Time course of changes in lactate and free fatty acids after experimental brain injury and relationship to morphologic damage. AU - Dhillon,H S, AU - Dose,J M, AU - Scheff,S W, AU - Prasad,M R, PY - 1997/7/1/pubmed PY - 1997/7/1/medline PY - 1997/7/1/entrez SP - 240 EP - 9 JF - Experimental neurology JO - Exp Neurol VL - 146 IS - 1 N2 - Regional levels of lactate and free fatty acids (FFA) were measured after lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury in rats. At 5 min after injury, tissue concentrations of lactate were elevated in the cortices and hippocampi of both ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Whereas lactate levels had returned to normal by about 20 min after injury in the penumbra and contralateral cortices, their elevation persisted in the ipsilateral injured cortex and hippocampus for 24 h after injury. Increases in the levels of FFA (particularly stearic and arachidonic acids) were observed in the cortices and hippocampi of both ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres at 5 min after injury; these levels returned to normal in only the penumbra and contralateral cortices by 20 min after injury. Increased amounts of palmitic and oleic acids were also found only in the injured left cortex and ipsilateral hippocampus at 20 min or later after injury. In general, these elevations persisted for as long as 6 to 24 h in the injured cortex and for 2.5 to 24 h after injury in the ipsilateral hippocampus. Histologic studies revealed a similar extent of damage in the cortex between 5 min and 24 h after injury, whereas damage in the CA3 region of the ipsilateral hippocampus increased during that period. These findings suggest a role for lactic acid and FFA, two secondary injury factors, in neuronal cell loss after brain injury. SN - 0014-4886 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9225757/Time_course_of_changes_in_lactate_and_free_fatty_acids_after_experimental_brain_injury_and_relationship_to_morphologic_damage_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0014-4886(97)96524-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -