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The relation of alcohol intake to coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality in a beer-drinking population.

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies indicate that light to moderate alcohol consumption from beer, wine, or spirits is associated with a reduction in all-cause mortality, owing primarily to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). To find out whether this protective effect of small to moderate amounts of alcohol could be confirmed in Germany, where much of the alcohol consumed is taken in the form of beer, we studied the relation between alcohol and CHD and total mortality in a population of southern Germany. We conducted a prospective cohort study from 1984 to 1992 among 1,071 men and 1,013 women, age 45-64 years at baseline, from the Augsburg region. Eighty-seven per cent of men and 56% of women reported drinking alcohol at baseline. Among drinkers, men had an average alcohol intake of 42 gm per day, of which 33 gm per day came from beer. Women who drank had an average alcohol intake of 16 gm per day and derived about half of it from beer and the other half from wine. During the 8 years of follow-up, 96 deaths (all causes) and 62 incident CHD events (nonfatal and fatal) occurred in men, and 45 deaths (all causes) occurred in women. Adjusting for a number of potential confounders, in men the adjusted hazard rate ratio (HRR) of CHD events for drinkers as compared with nondrinkers was 0.51 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.27-0.95]; this protective effect starts with the 0.1-19.9 gm per day alcohol category and does not change much with higher intake. In men, the adjusted total mortality HRR for drinkers as compared with nondrinkers was 0.59 (95% CI = 0.36-0.97). The total mortality HRRs for the different alcohol groups compared with nondrinkers show a U-shaped curve, with the lowest HRR of 0.46 (95% CI = 0.20-0.80) for the 20-39.9 gm per day alcohol group and an HRR of 1.04 (95% CI = 0.54-2.00) for the > or = 80 gm per day alcohol group. In women, the total mortality HRR for those drinking up to 19.9 gm per day as compared with nondrinkers was 0.46 (95% CI = 0.22-0.96).

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Institute of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, University of Münster, Germany.

    , , ,

    Source

    Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) 8:2 1997 Mar pg 150-6

    MeSH

    Age Distribution
    Aged
    Alcohol Drinking
    Beer
    Cohort Studies
    Coronary Disease
    Data Collection
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Poisson Distribution
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Risk Factors
    Sex Distribution
    Socioeconomic Factors
    Survival Rate
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    9229206

    Citation

    Keil, U, et al. "The Relation of Alcohol Intake to Coronary Heart Disease and All-cause Mortality in a Beer-drinking Population." Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), vol. 8, no. 2, 1997, pp. 150-6.
    Keil U, Chambless LE, Döring A, et al. The relation of alcohol intake to coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality in a beer-drinking population. Epidemiology. 1997;8(2):150-6.
    Keil, U., Chambless, L. E., Döring, A., Filipiak, B., & Stieber, J. (1997). The relation of alcohol intake to coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality in a beer-drinking population. Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), 8(2), pp. 150-6.
    Keil U, et al. The Relation of Alcohol Intake to Coronary Heart Disease and All-cause Mortality in a Beer-drinking Population. Epidemiology. 1997;8(2):150-6. PubMed PMID: 9229206.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The relation of alcohol intake to coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality in a beer-drinking population. AU - Keil,U, AU - Chambless,L E, AU - Döring,A, AU - Filipiak,B, AU - Stieber,J, PY - 1997/3/1/pubmed PY - 1997/3/1/medline PY - 1997/3/1/entrez SP - 150 EP - 6 JF - Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) JO - Epidemiology VL - 8 IS - 2 N2 - Epidemiologic studies indicate that light to moderate alcohol consumption from beer, wine, or spirits is associated with a reduction in all-cause mortality, owing primarily to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). To find out whether this protective effect of small to moderate amounts of alcohol could be confirmed in Germany, where much of the alcohol consumed is taken in the form of beer, we studied the relation between alcohol and CHD and total mortality in a population of southern Germany. We conducted a prospective cohort study from 1984 to 1992 among 1,071 men and 1,013 women, age 45-64 years at baseline, from the Augsburg region. Eighty-seven per cent of men and 56% of women reported drinking alcohol at baseline. Among drinkers, men had an average alcohol intake of 42 gm per day, of which 33 gm per day came from beer. Women who drank had an average alcohol intake of 16 gm per day and derived about half of it from beer and the other half from wine. During the 8 years of follow-up, 96 deaths (all causes) and 62 incident CHD events (nonfatal and fatal) occurred in men, and 45 deaths (all causes) occurred in women. Adjusting for a number of potential confounders, in men the adjusted hazard rate ratio (HRR) of CHD events for drinkers as compared with nondrinkers was 0.51 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.27-0.95]; this protective effect starts with the 0.1-19.9 gm per day alcohol category and does not change much with higher intake. In men, the adjusted total mortality HRR for drinkers as compared with nondrinkers was 0.59 (95% CI = 0.36-0.97). The total mortality HRRs for the different alcohol groups compared with nondrinkers show a U-shaped curve, with the lowest HRR of 0.46 (95% CI = 0.20-0.80) for the 20-39.9 gm per day alcohol group and an HRR of 1.04 (95% CI = 0.54-2.00) for the > or = 80 gm per day alcohol group. In women, the total mortality HRR for those drinking up to 19.9 gm per day as compared with nondrinkers was 0.46 (95% CI = 0.22-0.96). SN - 1044-3983 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9229206/The_relation_of_alcohol_intake_to_coronary_heart_disease_and_all_cause_mortality_in_a_beer_drinking_population_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=9229206 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -