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Changes in plasma tryptophan/branched chain amino acid ratio in responses to training volume variation.

Abstract

The major symptoms of overtraining including decreased exercise performance, altered mood states, and depleted muscle glycogen stores closely resemble the effects of brain serotonin, the level of which is dependent on the plasma ratio of tryptophan to branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). To examine the relation between plasma amino acids and overtraining, ten highly-trained endurance runners underwent two weeks of base training (normal training) before increasing their training volume by 40% for two weeks to achieve a state of short-term overtraining (or overreaching). The overtraining period was followed by two weeks of recovery in which training volume was reduced by 41% of the base training. For the whole group, no significant changes were observed in running economy and maximum oxygen uptake. There were no changes in resting heart rate, blood pressure, resting metabolic rate, and serum cortisol level in response to the changes in training volume. The runners experienced a significant increase (p < 0.05) in fatigue score for the profile of mood states when the training volume was increased. The elevated fatigue score returned to baseline when the training volume was reduced. Plasma free or total tryptophan, BCAA, and the tryptophan/BCAA ratio were not significantly altered throughout the course of this study. We concluded that proposed physiological markers of overtraining, including plasma tryptophan and BCAA levels, were unchanged despite a 40% increase in training volume.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Exercise Science, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Affect
    Amino Acids, Branched-Chain
    Anaerobic Threshold
    Blood Pressure
    Body Composition
    Body Mass Index
    Brain
    Energy Metabolism
    Fatigue
    Glycogen
    Heart Rate
    Humans
    Hydrocortisone
    Male
    Muscle, Skeletal
    Oxygen Consumption
    Physical Endurance
    Plasma Volume
    Psychomotor Performance
    Respiration
    Rest
    Running
    Serotonin
    Tryptophan

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    9231843

    Citation

    Tanaka, H, et al. "Changes in Plasma Tryptophan/branched Chain Amino Acid Ratio in Responses to Training Volume Variation." International Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 18, no. 4, 1997, pp. 270-5.
    Tanaka H, West KA, Duncan GE, et al. Changes in plasma tryptophan/branched chain amino acid ratio in responses to training volume variation. Int J Sports Med. 1997;18(4):270-5.
    Tanaka, H., West, K. A., Duncan, G. E., & Bassett, D. R. (1997). Changes in plasma tryptophan/branched chain amino acid ratio in responses to training volume variation. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 18(4), pp. 270-5.
    Tanaka H, et al. Changes in Plasma Tryptophan/branched Chain Amino Acid Ratio in Responses to Training Volume Variation. Int J Sports Med. 1997;18(4):270-5. PubMed PMID: 9231843.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Changes in plasma tryptophan/branched chain amino acid ratio in responses to training volume variation. AU - Tanaka,H, AU - West,K A, AU - Duncan,G E, AU - Bassett,D R,Jr PY - 1997/5/1/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1997/5/1/entrez SP - 270 EP - 5 JF - International journal of sports medicine JO - Int J Sports Med VL - 18 IS - 4 N2 - The major symptoms of overtraining including decreased exercise performance, altered mood states, and depleted muscle glycogen stores closely resemble the effects of brain serotonin, the level of which is dependent on the plasma ratio of tryptophan to branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). To examine the relation between plasma amino acids and overtraining, ten highly-trained endurance runners underwent two weeks of base training (normal training) before increasing their training volume by 40% for two weeks to achieve a state of short-term overtraining (or overreaching). The overtraining period was followed by two weeks of recovery in which training volume was reduced by 41% of the base training. For the whole group, no significant changes were observed in running economy and maximum oxygen uptake. There were no changes in resting heart rate, blood pressure, resting metabolic rate, and serum cortisol level in response to the changes in training volume. The runners experienced a significant increase (p < 0.05) in fatigue score for the profile of mood states when the training volume was increased. The elevated fatigue score returned to baseline when the training volume was reduced. Plasma free or total tryptophan, BCAA, and the tryptophan/BCAA ratio were not significantly altered throughout the course of this study. We concluded that proposed physiological markers of overtraining, including plasma tryptophan and BCAA levels, were unchanged despite a 40% increase in training volume. SN - 0172-4622 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9231843/Changes_in_plasma_tryptophan/branched_chain_amino_acid_ratio_in_responses_to_training_volume_variation_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2007-972632 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -