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Acoustic neuroma surgery: outcome analysis of patient-perceived disability.
Am J Otol. 1997 Jul; 18(4):427-35.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Numerous studies have investigated the outcome of acoustic neuroma (AN) treatment using classical medical measures. In an effort to describe the long-term lifestyle consequences of AN removal from the patient's perspective, patients filled out detailed questionnaires concerning their functional status.

STUDY DESIGN

This was a retrospective survey.

SETTING

This study was performed at a tertiary referral center.

PATIENTS

A total of 130 late postoperative acoustic neuroma patients were surveyed a minimum of 6 months following surgery (average, 39 months). Survey response rate was 65% (130/200).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

The main outcome measures were the patient's perception of their hearing, balance, facial expression, and eye function in relation to its impact upon the activities of daily life. A comparison of pretreatment with long-term posttreatment functional levels.

RESULTS

When asked to designate their "most significant" symptom, hearing loss was by far most prevalent (61.3%), followed by balance troubles (14.3%) and facial weakness (10.1%). The relatively low incidence of facial weakness as the patient's dominant complaint was somewhat surprising. When considering the incidence of each symptom, women were more likely to complain of facial weakness, dry eye, and headache, whereas men had a marginally higher incidence of hearing loss and imbalance. Patient age had no apparent influence upon either the distribution or severity of symptomatic complaints. Both hearing in the tumor ear and overall auditory function (e.g., the ability to understand in a restaurant) tended to worsen following surgery. One finding, which was both unanticipated and intriguing, was the improvement in sound localization ability reported by 57% of patients following surgery. Although the proportion of patients complaining of frequent tinnitus increased postoperatively, the number of patients who found the tinnitus troublesome decreased markedly. In terms of balance function, only 31% preoperatively and 15% postoperatively described themselves as free of balance difficulties. An aid to ambulation (e.g., cane, walker) was needed in five patients (4%) preoperatively, two of whom regained the ability to walk independently following tumor removal.

CONCLUSIONS

These functional outcome data provide much useful information to both patient and clinician to consider when contemplating the optimal course of AN management. Although virtually all acoustic neuroma patients have some degree of persistent symptoms over the long-term, the data indicates that most of these are attributable to the tumor itself as opposed to the after effects of its surgical removal. The relatively slight differences between preoperative and late postoperative symptom profiles was a rather unanticipated finding. As the degree of disability tends to increase with larger tumor sizes, these data tend to support a policy of early intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9233481

Citation

Rigby, P L., et al. "Acoustic Neuroma Surgery: Outcome Analysis of Patient-perceived Disability." The American Journal of Otology, vol. 18, no. 4, 1997, pp. 427-35.
Rigby PL, Shah SB, Jackler RK, et al. Acoustic neuroma surgery: outcome analysis of patient-perceived disability. Am J Otol. 1997;18(4):427-35.
Rigby, P. L., Shah, S. B., Jackler, R. K., Chung, J. H., & Cooke, D. D. (1997). Acoustic neuroma surgery: outcome analysis of patient-perceived disability. The American Journal of Otology, 18(4), 427-35.
Rigby PL, et al. Acoustic Neuroma Surgery: Outcome Analysis of Patient-perceived Disability. Am J Otol. 1997;18(4):427-35. PubMed PMID: 9233481.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acoustic neuroma surgery: outcome analysis of patient-perceived disability. AU - Rigby,P L, AU - Shah,S B, AU - Jackler,R K, AU - Chung,J H, AU - Cooke,D D, PY - 1997/7/1/pubmed PY - 1997/7/1/medline PY - 1997/7/1/entrez SP - 427 EP - 35 JF - The American journal of otology JO - Am J Otol VL - 18 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Numerous studies have investigated the outcome of acoustic neuroma (AN) treatment using classical medical measures. In an effort to describe the long-term lifestyle consequences of AN removal from the patient's perspective, patients filled out detailed questionnaires concerning their functional status. STUDY DESIGN: This was a retrospective survey. SETTING: This study was performed at a tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: A total of 130 late postoperative acoustic neuroma patients were surveyed a minimum of 6 months following surgery (average, 39 months). Survey response rate was 65% (130/200). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main outcome measures were the patient's perception of their hearing, balance, facial expression, and eye function in relation to its impact upon the activities of daily life. A comparison of pretreatment with long-term posttreatment functional levels. RESULTS: When asked to designate their "most significant" symptom, hearing loss was by far most prevalent (61.3%), followed by balance troubles (14.3%) and facial weakness (10.1%). The relatively low incidence of facial weakness as the patient's dominant complaint was somewhat surprising. When considering the incidence of each symptom, women were more likely to complain of facial weakness, dry eye, and headache, whereas men had a marginally higher incidence of hearing loss and imbalance. Patient age had no apparent influence upon either the distribution or severity of symptomatic complaints. Both hearing in the tumor ear and overall auditory function (e.g., the ability to understand in a restaurant) tended to worsen following surgery. One finding, which was both unanticipated and intriguing, was the improvement in sound localization ability reported by 57% of patients following surgery. Although the proportion of patients complaining of frequent tinnitus increased postoperatively, the number of patients who found the tinnitus troublesome decreased markedly. In terms of balance function, only 31% preoperatively and 15% postoperatively described themselves as free of balance difficulties. An aid to ambulation (e.g., cane, walker) was needed in five patients (4%) preoperatively, two of whom regained the ability to walk independently following tumor removal. CONCLUSIONS: These functional outcome data provide much useful information to both patient and clinician to consider when contemplating the optimal course of AN management. Although virtually all acoustic neuroma patients have some degree of persistent symptoms over the long-term, the data indicates that most of these are attributable to the tumor itself as opposed to the after effects of its surgical removal. The relatively slight differences between preoperative and late postoperative symptom profiles was a rather unanticipated finding. As the degree of disability tends to increase with larger tumor sizes, these data tend to support a policy of early intervention. SN - 0192-9763 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9233481/Acoustic_neuroma_surgery:_outcome_analysis_of_patient_perceived_disability_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=9233481.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -