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Fat or lean tissue mass: which one is the major determinant of bone mineral mass in healthy postmenopausal women?
J Bone Miner Res 1997; 12(1):144-51JB

Abstract

The relative importance of fat and lean tissue mass in determining bone mineral mass among postmenopausal women was examined in this 1-year longitudinal study. Fifty postmenopausal Caucasian women entered the study; 45 of them completed a 1-year follow-up. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was employed for measuring total and regional bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC), fat tissue mass (FTM), lean tissue mass (LTM), and body weight. Results from linear regression analysis using the cross-sectional data (n = 50) of the study indicated that LTM explained a larger percentage of variation in bone mineral mass than did FTM. FTM and LTM were found to be moderately correlated (r = 0.55); when FTM was entered in the same predicting regression models, LTM was a significant predictor (p < 0.05) of the total and regional BMC, but not BMD. The percent FTM (and inversely %LTM) was correlated with BMD and BMC, but significant correlation was primarily found only for total body BMD (or BMC). Weight was the best predictor of total body BMD and BMC. Longitudinally (n = 45), annual changes in both FTM and weight were significantly associated with annual changes in regional BMD after adjustment for initial bone mineral values (p < 0.05). We conclude that bone mineral mass is more closely related to LTM than to FTM, while annual changes in regional BMD are more closely correlated with changes in FTM in healthy postmenopausal women. Meanwhile, increased body weight is significantly associated with increased bone mineral mass.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The University of Arizona, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Tucson 85716, U.S.A.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9240737

Citation

Chen, Z, et al. "Fat or Lean Tissue Mass: Which One Is the Major Determinant of Bone Mineral Mass in Healthy Postmenopausal Women?" Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 12, no. 1, 1997, pp. 144-51.
Chen Z, Lohman TG, Stini WA, et al. Fat or lean tissue mass: which one is the major determinant of bone mineral mass in healthy postmenopausal women? J Bone Miner Res. 1997;12(1):144-51.
Chen, Z., Lohman, T. G., Stini, W. A., Ritenbaugh, C., & Aickin, M. (1997). Fat or lean tissue mass: which one is the major determinant of bone mineral mass in healthy postmenopausal women? Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 12(1), pp. 144-51.
Chen Z, et al. Fat or Lean Tissue Mass: Which One Is the Major Determinant of Bone Mineral Mass in Healthy Postmenopausal Women. J Bone Miner Res. 1997;12(1):144-51. PubMed PMID: 9240737.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fat or lean tissue mass: which one is the major determinant of bone mineral mass in healthy postmenopausal women? AU - Chen,Z, AU - Lohman,T G, AU - Stini,W A, AU - Ritenbaugh,C, AU - Aickin,M, PY - 1997/1/1/pubmed PY - 1997/1/1/medline PY - 1997/1/1/entrez SP - 144 EP - 51 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J. Bone Miner. Res. VL - 12 IS - 1 N2 - The relative importance of fat and lean tissue mass in determining bone mineral mass among postmenopausal women was examined in this 1-year longitudinal study. Fifty postmenopausal Caucasian women entered the study; 45 of them completed a 1-year follow-up. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was employed for measuring total and regional bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC), fat tissue mass (FTM), lean tissue mass (LTM), and body weight. Results from linear regression analysis using the cross-sectional data (n = 50) of the study indicated that LTM explained a larger percentage of variation in bone mineral mass than did FTM. FTM and LTM were found to be moderately correlated (r = 0.55); when FTM was entered in the same predicting regression models, LTM was a significant predictor (p < 0.05) of the total and regional BMC, but not BMD. The percent FTM (and inversely %LTM) was correlated with BMD and BMC, but significant correlation was primarily found only for total body BMD (or BMC). Weight was the best predictor of total body BMD and BMC. Longitudinally (n = 45), annual changes in both FTM and weight were significantly associated with annual changes in regional BMD after adjustment for initial bone mineral values (p < 0.05). We conclude that bone mineral mass is more closely related to LTM than to FTM, while annual changes in regional BMD are more closely correlated with changes in FTM in healthy postmenopausal women. Meanwhile, increased body weight is significantly associated with increased bone mineral mass. SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9240737/Fat_or_lean_tissue_mass:_which_one_is_the_major_determinant_of_bone_mineral_mass_in_healthy_postmenopausal_women L2 - https://doi.org/10.1359/jbmr.1997.12.1.144 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -