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Caffeinated beverages, decaffeinated coffee, and spontaneous abortion.
Epidemiology 1997; 8(5):515-23E

Abstract

We examined the relations between spontaneous abortion and the consumption of caffeine, individual caffeine-containing beverages (coffee, tea, and soda), and decaffeinated coffee in a prospective study of 5,144 pregnant women. We collected information about potential risk factors for spontaneous abortion, including consumption of caffeinated beverages and decaffeinated coffee before and during pregnancy, by interview in the first trimester. Neither total estimated caffeine nor individual caffeinated beverage consumption during the first trimester was associated with an appreciable increase in risk for spontaneous abortion. The adjusted odds ratio for consumption of greater than 300 mg per day of caffeine was 1.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.8-2.1] after adjustment for maternal age, pregnancy history, cigarette and alcohol consumption, employment, race, gestational age at interview, and marital and socioeconomic status. The adjusted odds ratio for spontaneous abortion related to consumption of three or more cups of decaffeinated coffee during the first trimester was 2.4 (95% CI = 1.3-4.7) in the same model. Although we could not demonstrate this with available data, we suspect that this association was due to bias resulting from the relations among fetal viability, symptoms of pregnancy such as nausea, and consumption patterns during pregnancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Reproductive Epidemiology Section, Department of Health Services, Emeryville, CA 94608, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9270953

Citation

Fenster, L, et al. "Caffeinated Beverages, Decaffeinated Coffee, and Spontaneous Abortion." Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), vol. 8, no. 5, 1997, pp. 515-23.
Fenster L, Hubbard AE, Swan SH, et al. Caffeinated beverages, decaffeinated coffee, and spontaneous abortion. Epidemiology. 1997;8(5):515-23.
Fenster, L., Hubbard, A. E., Swan, S. H., Windham, G. C., Waller, K., Hiatt, R. A., & Benowitz, N. (1997). Caffeinated beverages, decaffeinated coffee, and spontaneous abortion. Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), 8(5), pp. 515-23.
Fenster L, et al. Caffeinated Beverages, Decaffeinated Coffee, and Spontaneous Abortion. Epidemiology. 1997;8(5):515-23. PubMed PMID: 9270953.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Caffeinated beverages, decaffeinated coffee, and spontaneous abortion. AU - Fenster,L, AU - Hubbard,A E, AU - Swan,S H, AU - Windham,G C, AU - Waller,K, AU - Hiatt,R A, AU - Benowitz,N, PY - 1997/9/1/pubmed PY - 1997/9/1/medline PY - 1997/9/1/entrez SP - 515 EP - 23 JF - Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) JO - Epidemiology VL - 8 IS - 5 N2 - We examined the relations between spontaneous abortion and the consumption of caffeine, individual caffeine-containing beverages (coffee, tea, and soda), and decaffeinated coffee in a prospective study of 5,144 pregnant women. We collected information about potential risk factors for spontaneous abortion, including consumption of caffeinated beverages and decaffeinated coffee before and during pregnancy, by interview in the first trimester. Neither total estimated caffeine nor individual caffeinated beverage consumption during the first trimester was associated with an appreciable increase in risk for spontaneous abortion. The adjusted odds ratio for consumption of greater than 300 mg per day of caffeine was 1.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.8-2.1] after adjustment for maternal age, pregnancy history, cigarette and alcohol consumption, employment, race, gestational age at interview, and marital and socioeconomic status. The adjusted odds ratio for spontaneous abortion related to consumption of three or more cups of decaffeinated coffee during the first trimester was 2.4 (95% CI = 1.3-4.7) in the same model. Although we could not demonstrate this with available data, we suspect that this association was due to bias resulting from the relations among fetal viability, symptoms of pregnancy such as nausea, and consumption patterns during pregnancy. SN - 1044-3983 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9270953/Caffeinated_beverages_decaffeinated_coffee_and_spontaneous_abortion_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=9270953 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -