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Association between central nervous system infections during childhood and adult onset schizophrenia and other psychoses: a 28-year follow-up.
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Aug; 26(4):837-43.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Maternal exposure to influenza epidemics during pregnancy may increase the risk of schizophrenia in the offspring. We investigated the association between central nervous system (CNS) infections defined prospectively up to the age of 14, and later onset of schizophrenia and other psychoses in the 1966 birth cohort in Northern Finland, which covers 96% of all births in the area during that year.

METHODS

Data regarding CNS infections were collected 1966-1980. Registered diagnoses of psychoses in 1982-1993 were validated on DSM-III-R criteria.

RESULTS

Out of 11,017 subjects, 145 had suffered a CNS infection during childhood, 102 of them a viral infection, 76 had DSM-III-R schizophrenia and 53 some other psychosis. Four cases of schizophrenia had suffered viral CNS infection and two cases of other psychosis bacterial infection. When neurological abnormalities and father's social class were adjusted odds ratio (OR) of schizophrenia after viral CNS infection was 4.8 (95% confidence intervals [CI] : 1.6-14.0); the other significant risk factors being intelligence quotient (IQ) < 85, perinatal brain damage and male sex but not epilepsy. Similarly adjusted OR of other psychoses was 6.9 (95% CI: 1.4-32.8) after bacterial CNS infection; the other significant risk factors being IQ < 85 and severe hearing defect. Two of the live viral infections were caused by Coxsackie B5 during an epidemic in which 16 neonates were infected together.

CONCLUSIONS

Central nervous system infections during childhood clearly carried an increased risk of adult onset schizophrenia or other psychoses, viral infections being important for schizophrenia, particularly Coxsackie B5 during the newborn period.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9279617

Citation

Rantakallio, P, et al. "Association Between Central Nervous System Infections During Childhood and Adult Onset Schizophrenia and Other Psychoses: a 28-year Follow-up." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 26, no. 4, 1997, pp. 837-43.
Rantakallio P, Jones P, Moring J, et al. Association between central nervous system infections during childhood and adult onset schizophrenia and other psychoses: a 28-year follow-up. Int J Epidemiol. 1997;26(4):837-43.
Rantakallio, P., Jones, P., Moring, J., & Von Wendt, L. (1997). Association between central nervous system infections during childhood and adult onset schizophrenia and other psychoses: a 28-year follow-up. International Journal of Epidemiology, 26(4), 837-43.
Rantakallio P, et al. Association Between Central Nervous System Infections During Childhood and Adult Onset Schizophrenia and Other Psychoses: a 28-year Follow-up. Int J Epidemiol. 1997;26(4):837-43. PubMed PMID: 9279617.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between central nervous system infections during childhood and adult onset schizophrenia and other psychoses: a 28-year follow-up. AU - Rantakallio,P, AU - Jones,P, AU - Moring,J, AU - Von Wendt,L, PY - 1997/8/1/pubmed PY - 1997/8/1/medline PY - 1997/8/1/entrez SP - 837 EP - 43 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Maternal exposure to influenza epidemics during pregnancy may increase the risk of schizophrenia in the offspring. We investigated the association between central nervous system (CNS) infections defined prospectively up to the age of 14, and later onset of schizophrenia and other psychoses in the 1966 birth cohort in Northern Finland, which covers 96% of all births in the area during that year. METHODS: Data regarding CNS infections were collected 1966-1980. Registered diagnoses of psychoses in 1982-1993 were validated on DSM-III-R criteria. RESULTS: Out of 11,017 subjects, 145 had suffered a CNS infection during childhood, 102 of them a viral infection, 76 had DSM-III-R schizophrenia and 53 some other psychosis. Four cases of schizophrenia had suffered viral CNS infection and two cases of other psychosis bacterial infection. When neurological abnormalities and father's social class were adjusted odds ratio (OR) of schizophrenia after viral CNS infection was 4.8 (95% confidence intervals [CI] : 1.6-14.0); the other significant risk factors being intelligence quotient (IQ) < 85, perinatal brain damage and male sex but not epilepsy. Similarly adjusted OR of other psychoses was 6.9 (95% CI: 1.4-32.8) after bacterial CNS infection; the other significant risk factors being IQ < 85 and severe hearing defect. Two of the live viral infections were caused by Coxsackie B5 during an epidemic in which 16 neonates were infected together. CONCLUSIONS: Central nervous system infections during childhood clearly carried an increased risk of adult onset schizophrenia or other psychoses, viral infections being important for schizophrenia, particularly Coxsackie B5 during the newborn period. SN - 0300-5771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9279617/Association_between_central_nervous_system_infections_during_childhood_and_adult_onset_schizophrenia_and_other_psychoses:_a_28_year_follow_up_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/26.4.837 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -