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Virus transmission via food.
World Health Stat Q. 1997; 50(1-2):90-101.WH

Abstract

Viruses are transmitted to humans via foods as a result of direct or indirect contamination of the foods with human faeces. Viruses transmitted by a faecal-oral route are not strongly dependent on foods as vehicles of transmission, but viruses are important among agents of foodborne disease. Vehicles are most often molluscs from contaminated waters, but many other foods are contaminated directly by infected persons. The viruses most often foodborne are the hepatitis A virus and the Norwalk-like gastroenteritis viruses. Detection methods for these viruses in foods are very difficult and costly; the methods are not routine. Indicators that would rapidly and reliably suggest the presence of viral contamination of foods are still being sought. Contamination can be prevented by keeping faeces out of food or by treating vehicles such as water in order to inactivate virus that might be carried to food in this way. Virus cannot multiply in food, but can usually be inactivated by adequate heating. Other methods of inactivating viruses within a food are relatively unreliable, but viruses in water and on exposed surfaces can be inactivated with ultraviolet light or with strong oxidizing agents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, USA. docliver@ucdavis.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9282391

Citation

Cliver, D O.. "Virus Transmission Via Food." World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel De Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales, vol. 50, no. 1-2, 1997, pp. 90-101.
Cliver DO. Virus transmission via food. World Health Stat Q. 1997;50(1-2):90-101.
Cliver, D. O. (1997). Virus transmission via food. World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel De Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales, 50(1-2), 90-101.
Cliver DO. Virus Transmission Via Food. World Health Stat Q. 1997;50(1-2):90-101. PubMed PMID: 9282391.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Virus transmission via food. A1 - Cliver,D O, PY - 1997/1/1/pubmed PY - 1997/1/1/medline PY - 1997/1/1/entrez SP - 90 EP - 101 JF - World health statistics quarterly. Rapport trimestriel de statistiques sanitaires mondiales JO - World Health Stat Q VL - 50 IS - 1-2 N2 - Viruses are transmitted to humans via foods as a result of direct or indirect contamination of the foods with human faeces. Viruses transmitted by a faecal-oral route are not strongly dependent on foods as vehicles of transmission, but viruses are important among agents of foodborne disease. Vehicles are most often molluscs from contaminated waters, but many other foods are contaminated directly by infected persons. The viruses most often foodborne are the hepatitis A virus and the Norwalk-like gastroenteritis viruses. Detection methods for these viruses in foods are very difficult and costly; the methods are not routine. Indicators that would rapidly and reliably suggest the presence of viral contamination of foods are still being sought. Contamination can be prevented by keeping faeces out of food or by treating vehicles such as water in order to inactivate virus that might be carried to food in this way. Virus cannot multiply in food, but can usually be inactivated by adequate heating. Other methods of inactivating viruses within a food are relatively unreliable, but viruses in water and on exposed surfaces can be inactivated with ultraviolet light or with strong oxidizing agents. SN - 0379-8070 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9282391/Virus_transmission_via_food_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/foodborneillness.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -