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The effects of smoking on bone mass and the rates of bone loss among elderly Japanese-American men.
J Bone Miner Res 1997; 12(9):1495-501JB

Abstract

Bone density and bone loss rates were examined among Japanese-American men categorized as current cigarette smokers, past smokers, and nonsmokers. The design included a retrospective study of smoking and bone density and a prospective study of current smoking and bone loss rates. The mean length of follow-up was 5 years; the setting was the island of Oahu. The subjects included 1303 men in the Hawaii Osteoporosis Study, 51-82 years old at their initial examination. Twenty percent were current smokers, 45% past smokers, and 35% had never smoked. Their bone density was measured at the distal and proximal radius and calcaneus using single photon absorptiometry. Compared with never smokers, current and past smokers had significantly lower bone density, especially in the predominantly cancellous calcaneus (4.8 and 4.3% lower, respectively) and partially trabecular distal radius (1.8 and 3.3% lower, respectively). The magnitude of the smoking effect was linked strongly to the duration of smoking and also to the number of cigarettes smoked. Bone loss rates subsequent to the initial measurement were greater in the current smokers than the never smokers (20.5, 27.2, and 9.7% greater at the calcaneus, distal, and proximal radius, respectively) but the differences did not achieve significance. Smokers of more than one pack per day had 32.0, 77.6, and 30.7% greater loss rates than never smokers in these same sites; the difference achieved significance at the distal radius. The results from the distal radius suggest that these smokers may increase their fracture risk 10-30% per decade of smoking. The adverse effects of smoking appeared to be greater in cancellous than cortical bone.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of California Davis, School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Sacramento, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9286767

Citation

Vogel, J M., et al. "The Effects of Smoking On Bone Mass and the Rates of Bone Loss Among Elderly Japanese-American Men." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 12, no. 9, 1997, pp. 1495-501.
Vogel JM, Davis JW, Nomura A, et al. The effects of smoking on bone mass and the rates of bone loss among elderly Japanese-American men. J Bone Miner Res. 1997;12(9):1495-501.
Vogel, J. M., Davis, J. W., Nomura, A., Wasnich, R. D., & Ross, P. D. (1997). The effects of smoking on bone mass and the rates of bone loss among elderly Japanese-American men. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 12(9), pp. 1495-501.
Vogel JM, et al. The Effects of Smoking On Bone Mass and the Rates of Bone Loss Among Elderly Japanese-American Men. J Bone Miner Res. 1997;12(9):1495-501. PubMed PMID: 9286767.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of smoking on bone mass and the rates of bone loss among elderly Japanese-American men. AU - Vogel,J M, AU - Davis,J W, AU - Nomura,A, AU - Wasnich,R D, AU - Ross,P D, PY - 1997/9/1/pubmed PY - 1997/9/1/medline PY - 1997/9/1/entrez SP - 1495 EP - 501 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J. Bone Miner. Res. VL - 12 IS - 9 N2 - Bone density and bone loss rates were examined among Japanese-American men categorized as current cigarette smokers, past smokers, and nonsmokers. The design included a retrospective study of smoking and bone density and a prospective study of current smoking and bone loss rates. The mean length of follow-up was 5 years; the setting was the island of Oahu. The subjects included 1303 men in the Hawaii Osteoporosis Study, 51-82 years old at their initial examination. Twenty percent were current smokers, 45% past smokers, and 35% had never smoked. Their bone density was measured at the distal and proximal radius and calcaneus using single photon absorptiometry. Compared with never smokers, current and past smokers had significantly lower bone density, especially in the predominantly cancellous calcaneus (4.8 and 4.3% lower, respectively) and partially trabecular distal radius (1.8 and 3.3% lower, respectively). The magnitude of the smoking effect was linked strongly to the duration of smoking and also to the number of cigarettes smoked. Bone loss rates subsequent to the initial measurement were greater in the current smokers than the never smokers (20.5, 27.2, and 9.7% greater at the calcaneus, distal, and proximal radius, respectively) but the differences did not achieve significance. Smokers of more than one pack per day had 32.0, 77.6, and 30.7% greater loss rates than never smokers in these same sites; the difference achieved significance at the distal radius. The results from the distal radius suggest that these smokers may increase their fracture risk 10-30% per decade of smoking. The adverse effects of smoking appeared to be greater in cancellous than cortical bone. SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9286767/The_effects_of_smoking_on_bone_mass_and_the_rates_of_bone_loss_among_elderly_Japanese_American_men_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1359/jbmr.1997.12.9.1495 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -