Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Bacterial findings in acute maxillary sinusitis--European study.
Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1997; 529:165-8.AO

Abstract

Bacteriology of acute maxillary sinusitis was studied in 569 patients in 16 centers of 6 countries located throughout Europe during 1992-1994 by ENT specialists. Patients with symptoms of acute sinusitis lasting less than 3 weeks with ongoing purulent nasal discharge were included. Diagnosis was verified by sinus x-ray or ultrasonography and a positive aspiration finding in maxillary sinus puncture. One or more pathogens were isolated from the maxillary sinus aspirates of 375 (66%) patients. Fifty-six percent of patients harboured 1 pathogen and 10% multiple pathogenic organisms, respectively. Haemophilus influenzae was the most common pathogen isolated (148 isolates), occurring as a single pathogen in 14% of the patients. The occurrence of H. influenzae was highest in Finnish military hospital patients (43-48%), as compared with the non-military Finnish patients (9-11%) or to patients from other European centers (mean 13%). H. influenzae was more frequently beta-lactamase positive in other European centers (22%) than in Finnish centers (7%). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common pathogen isolated in other European centers (20%) but second most common in Finnish centers (13%). Moraxella catarrhalis occurred at quite similar frequency among Finnish centers (9-14%), but clearly less often in other centers (mean 4%). S. aureus, which in acute maxillary sinusitis is regarded as a contaminant from the nasal cavity, was more prevalent in other European centers (12%) than in Finnish centers (4%). In patients with acute maxillary sinusitis reliable bacteriological samples should be taken by antral aspiration directly from the diseased sinus.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Tampere University Hospital, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9288300

Citation

Penttilä, M, et al. "Bacterial Findings in Acute Maxillary sinusitis--European Study." Acta Oto-laryngologica. Supplementum, vol. 529, 1997, pp. 165-8.
Penttilä M, Savolainen S, Kiukaanniemi H, et al. Bacterial findings in acute maxillary sinusitis--European study. Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1997;529:165-8.
Penttilä, M., Savolainen, S., Kiukaanniemi, H., Forsblom, B., & Jousimies-Somer, H. (1997). Bacterial findings in acute maxillary sinusitis--European study. Acta Oto-laryngologica. Supplementum, 529, 165-8.
Penttilä M, et al. Bacterial Findings in Acute Maxillary sinusitis--European Study. Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1997;529:165-8. PubMed PMID: 9288300.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bacterial findings in acute maxillary sinusitis--European study. AU - Penttilä,M, AU - Savolainen,S, AU - Kiukaanniemi,H, AU - Forsblom,B, AU - Jousimies-Somer,H, PY - 1997/1/1/pubmed PY - 1997/1/1/medline PY - 1997/1/1/entrez SP - 165 EP - 8 JF - Acta oto-laryngologica. Supplementum JO - Acta Otolaryngol Suppl VL - 529 N2 - Bacteriology of acute maxillary sinusitis was studied in 569 patients in 16 centers of 6 countries located throughout Europe during 1992-1994 by ENT specialists. Patients with symptoms of acute sinusitis lasting less than 3 weeks with ongoing purulent nasal discharge were included. Diagnosis was verified by sinus x-ray or ultrasonography and a positive aspiration finding in maxillary sinus puncture. One or more pathogens were isolated from the maxillary sinus aspirates of 375 (66%) patients. Fifty-six percent of patients harboured 1 pathogen and 10% multiple pathogenic organisms, respectively. Haemophilus influenzae was the most common pathogen isolated (148 isolates), occurring as a single pathogen in 14% of the patients. The occurrence of H. influenzae was highest in Finnish military hospital patients (43-48%), as compared with the non-military Finnish patients (9-11%) or to patients from other European centers (mean 13%). H. influenzae was more frequently beta-lactamase positive in other European centers (22%) than in Finnish centers (7%). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common pathogen isolated in other European centers (20%) but second most common in Finnish centers (13%). Moraxella catarrhalis occurred at quite similar frequency among Finnish centers (9-14%), but clearly less often in other centers (mean 4%). S. aureus, which in acute maxillary sinusitis is regarded as a contaminant from the nasal cavity, was more prevalent in other European centers (12%) than in Finnish centers (4%). In patients with acute maxillary sinusitis reliable bacteriological samples should be taken by antral aspiration directly from the diseased sinus. SN - 0365-5237 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9288300/Bacterial_findings_in_acute_maxillary_sinusitis__European_study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -