Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A fresh cadaveric study of the paratubal muscles: implications for eustachian tube function in cleft palate.
Plast Reconstr Surg. 1997 Sep; 100(4):833-42.PR

Abstract

The aims of this anatomic investigation were to examine the levator veli palatini, tensor veli palatini, and salpingopharyngeus muscles in relation to normal eustachian tube function and to analyze the clinical implications of these data for tubal physiology in cleft palate individuals. Detailed dissections under 3.2x loupe magnification were conducted on the paratubal muscles of 15 fresh human adult cadaveric head specimens, paying particular attention to their cranial base anatomy. Each half of the cadaveric heads was examined separately, giving a sample size of 30. The cranial base origin of the levator veli palatini was the junction of the cartilaginous and bony parts of the eustachian tube. Contrary to statements in the existing literature, it had no origin from the quadrate area of the petrous temporal bone. In its path toward the velum, it was related inferiorly and lay almost parallel to the tube. The tensor veli palatini originated from the scaphoid fossa of the sphenoid bone and the tube. In contrast to previous descriptions, it was found to consist of a single sheet of muscle with no bilaminar structure. Its axis was oblique to that of the tube. The salpingopharyngeus was a slender muscle attached to the posteroinferior aspect of the pharyngeal end of the tube. It inserted into the palatopharyngeus inferiorly. These morphologic characteristics and anatomic relationships suggest that (1) the levator veli palatini opens the eustachian tube by isotonic contraction that results in displacement of the medial tubal cartilage and the tubal membrane, (2) the tensor veli palatini opens the tube directly by traction on the lateral tubal membrane and indirectly by rotation of the medial tubal cartilage by means of traction on the lateral tubal cartilage, (3) because of its consistently small size, the salpingopharyngeus is probably functionally the least important of the paratubal muscles, (4) the levator veli palatini is unable to cause tubal dilatation in cleft palate because it can only contract isometrically, and (5) tensor veli palatini function is probably unaffected by clefting. However, its mechanism of action may be disrupted iatrogenically by complete hamular fracture or division of its tendon.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plastic Surgery at Singapore General Hospital.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9290650

Citation

Huang, M H., et al. "A Fresh Cadaveric Study of the Paratubal Muscles: Implications for Eustachian Tube Function in Cleft Palate." Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, vol. 100, no. 4, 1997, pp. 833-42.
Huang MH, Lee ST, Rajendran K. A fresh cadaveric study of the paratubal muscles: implications for eustachian tube function in cleft palate. Plast Reconstr Surg. 1997;100(4):833-42.
Huang, M. H., Lee, S. T., & Rajendran, K. (1997). A fresh cadaveric study of the paratubal muscles: implications for eustachian tube function in cleft palate. Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 100(4), 833-42.
Huang MH, Lee ST, Rajendran K. A Fresh Cadaveric Study of the Paratubal Muscles: Implications for Eustachian Tube Function in Cleft Palate. Plast Reconstr Surg. 1997;100(4):833-42. PubMed PMID: 9290650.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A fresh cadaveric study of the paratubal muscles: implications for eustachian tube function in cleft palate. AU - Huang,M H, AU - Lee,S T, AU - Rajendran,K, PY - 1997/9/18/pubmed PY - 1997/9/18/medline PY - 1997/9/18/entrez SP - 833 EP - 42 JF - Plastic and reconstructive surgery JO - Plast Reconstr Surg VL - 100 IS - 4 N2 - The aims of this anatomic investigation were to examine the levator veli palatini, tensor veli palatini, and salpingopharyngeus muscles in relation to normal eustachian tube function and to analyze the clinical implications of these data for tubal physiology in cleft palate individuals. Detailed dissections under 3.2x loupe magnification were conducted on the paratubal muscles of 15 fresh human adult cadaveric head specimens, paying particular attention to their cranial base anatomy. Each half of the cadaveric heads was examined separately, giving a sample size of 30. The cranial base origin of the levator veli palatini was the junction of the cartilaginous and bony parts of the eustachian tube. Contrary to statements in the existing literature, it had no origin from the quadrate area of the petrous temporal bone. In its path toward the velum, it was related inferiorly and lay almost parallel to the tube. The tensor veli palatini originated from the scaphoid fossa of the sphenoid bone and the tube. In contrast to previous descriptions, it was found to consist of a single sheet of muscle with no bilaminar structure. Its axis was oblique to that of the tube. The salpingopharyngeus was a slender muscle attached to the posteroinferior aspect of the pharyngeal end of the tube. It inserted into the palatopharyngeus inferiorly. These morphologic characteristics and anatomic relationships suggest that (1) the levator veli palatini opens the eustachian tube by isotonic contraction that results in displacement of the medial tubal cartilage and the tubal membrane, (2) the tensor veli palatini opens the tube directly by traction on the lateral tubal membrane and indirectly by rotation of the medial tubal cartilage by means of traction on the lateral tubal cartilage, (3) because of its consistently small size, the salpingopharyngeus is probably functionally the least important of the paratubal muscles, (4) the levator veli palatini is unable to cause tubal dilatation in cleft palate because it can only contract isometrically, and (5) tensor veli palatini function is probably unaffected by clefting. However, its mechanism of action may be disrupted iatrogenically by complete hamular fracture or division of its tendon. SN - 0032-1052 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9290650/A_fresh_cadaveric_study_of_the_paratubal_muscles:_implications_for_eustachian_tube_function_in_cleft_palate_ L2 - https://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=9290650 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -