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Hyperhydration: thermoregulatory effects during compensable exercise-heat stress.
J Appl Physiol (1985). 1997 Sep; 83(3):860-6.JA

Abstract

This study examined the effects of hyperhydration on thermoregulatory responses during compensable exercise-heat stress. The general approach was to determine whether 1-h preexercise hyperhydration [29. 1 ml/kg lean body mass; with or without glycerol (1.2 g/kg lean body mass)] would improve sweating responses and reduce core temperature during exercise. During these experiments, the evaporative heat loss required (Ereq = 293 W/m2) to maintain steady-state core temperature was less than the maximal capacity (Emax = 462 W/m2) of the climate for evaporative heat loss (Ereq/Emax = 63%). Eight heat-acclimated men completed five trials: euhydration, glycerol hyperhydration, and water hyperhydration both with and without rehydration (replace sweat loss during exercise). During exercise in the heat (35 degrees C, 45% relative humidity), there was no difference between hyperhydration methods for increasing total body water (approximately 1.5 liters). Compared with euhydration, hyperhydration did not alter core temperature, skin temperature, whole body sweating rate, local sweating rate, sweating threshold temperature, sweating sensitivity, or heart rate responses. Similarly, no difference was found between water and glycerol hyperhydration for these physiological responses. These data demonstrate that hyperhydration provides no thermoregulatory advantage over the maintenance of euhydration during compensable exercise-heat stress.

Authors+Show Affiliations

United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick 01760-5007, Massachusetts 02215-1610, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9292474

Citation

Latzka, W A., et al. "Hyperhydration: Thermoregulatory Effects During Compensable Exercise-heat Stress." Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), vol. 83, no. 3, 1997, pp. 860-6.
Latzka WA, Sawka MN, Montain SJ, et al. Hyperhydration: thermoregulatory effects during compensable exercise-heat stress. J Appl Physiol (1985). 1997;83(3):860-6.
Latzka, W. A., Sawka, M. N., Montain, S. J., Skrinar, G. S., Fielding, R. A., Matott, R. P., & Pandolf, K. B. (1997). Hyperhydration: thermoregulatory effects during compensable exercise-heat stress. Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985), 83(3), 860-6.
Latzka WA, et al. Hyperhydration: Thermoregulatory Effects During Compensable Exercise-heat Stress. J Appl Physiol (1985). 1997;83(3):860-6. PubMed PMID: 9292474.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hyperhydration: thermoregulatory effects during compensable exercise-heat stress. AU - Latzka,W A, AU - Sawka,M N, AU - Montain,S J, AU - Skrinar,G S, AU - Fielding,R A, AU - Matott,R P, AU - Pandolf,K B, PY - 1997/9/18/pubmed PY - 1997/9/18/medline PY - 1997/9/18/entrez SP - 860 EP - 6 JF - Journal of applied physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) JO - J Appl Physiol (1985) VL - 83 IS - 3 N2 - This study examined the effects of hyperhydration on thermoregulatory responses during compensable exercise-heat stress. The general approach was to determine whether 1-h preexercise hyperhydration [29. 1 ml/kg lean body mass; with or without glycerol (1.2 g/kg lean body mass)] would improve sweating responses and reduce core temperature during exercise. During these experiments, the evaporative heat loss required (Ereq = 293 W/m2) to maintain steady-state core temperature was less than the maximal capacity (Emax = 462 W/m2) of the climate for evaporative heat loss (Ereq/Emax = 63%). Eight heat-acclimated men completed five trials: euhydration, glycerol hyperhydration, and water hyperhydration both with and without rehydration (replace sweat loss during exercise). During exercise in the heat (35 degrees C, 45% relative humidity), there was no difference between hyperhydration methods for increasing total body water (approximately 1.5 liters). Compared with euhydration, hyperhydration did not alter core temperature, skin temperature, whole body sweating rate, local sweating rate, sweating threshold temperature, sweating sensitivity, or heart rate responses. Similarly, no difference was found between water and glycerol hyperhydration for these physiological responses. These data demonstrate that hyperhydration provides no thermoregulatory advantage over the maintenance of euhydration during compensable exercise-heat stress. SN - 8750-7587 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9292474/Hyperhydration:_thermoregulatory_effects_during_compensable_exercise_heat_stress_ L2 - https://journals.physiology.org/doi/10.1152/jappl.1997.83.3.860?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -