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Patterns of alcohol consumption, smoking and illicit drug use in British university students: interfaculty comparisons.
Drug Alcohol Depend. 1997 Aug 25; 47(2):145-53.DA

Abstract

The use of tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs was investigated by questionnaire in 3699 second year students in ten UK universities. Patterns of use varied considerably between different faculty groups. Tobacco use was most prevalent in arts, social science and biological science students, among whom 36-39% of men and nearly one third of women were regular smokers, and least in female veterinary students (5%). Alcohol consumption was greatest in biological science students: 23% of those who drank exceeded 'hazardous' levels compared with 10-16% in all other faculties. Prevalence of cannabis use was highest in arts and social science students of whom 27% reported regular weekly use compared with 9-22% in other faculties. Experience with other illicit drugs was greatest among arts, social science and physical science students, of whom 64-71% reported experience at least once or twice, and least among veterinary students (42%). Identification of different lifestyles may help to direct appropriate health information to particular student groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacological Sciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9298336

Citation

Webb, E, et al. "Patterns of Alcohol Consumption, Smoking and Illicit Drug Use in British University Students: Interfaculty Comparisons." Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 47, no. 2, 1997, pp. 145-53.
Webb E, Ashton H, Kelly P, et al. Patterns of alcohol consumption, smoking and illicit drug use in British university students: interfaculty comparisons. Drug Alcohol Depend. 1997;47(2):145-53.
Webb, E., Ashton, H., Kelly, P., & Kamali, F. (1997). Patterns of alcohol consumption, smoking and illicit drug use in British university students: interfaculty comparisons. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 47(2), 145-53.
Webb E, et al. Patterns of Alcohol Consumption, Smoking and Illicit Drug Use in British University Students: Interfaculty Comparisons. Drug Alcohol Depend. 1997 Aug 25;47(2):145-53. PubMed PMID: 9298336.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Patterns of alcohol consumption, smoking and illicit drug use in British university students: interfaculty comparisons. AU - Webb,E, AU - Ashton,H, AU - Kelly,P, AU - Kamali,F, PY - 1997/8/25/pubmed PY - 1997/9/23/medline PY - 1997/8/25/entrez SP - 145 EP - 53 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 47 IS - 2 N2 - The use of tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs was investigated by questionnaire in 3699 second year students in ten UK universities. Patterns of use varied considerably between different faculty groups. Tobacco use was most prevalent in arts, social science and biological science students, among whom 36-39% of men and nearly one third of women were regular smokers, and least in female veterinary students (5%). Alcohol consumption was greatest in biological science students: 23% of those who drank exceeded 'hazardous' levels compared with 10-16% in all other faculties. Prevalence of cannabis use was highest in arts and social science students of whom 27% reported regular weekly use compared with 9-22% in other faculties. Experience with other illicit drugs was greatest among arts, social science and physical science students, of whom 64-71% reported experience at least once or twice, and least among veterinary students (42%). Identification of different lifestyles may help to direct appropriate health information to particular student groups. SN - 0376-8716 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9298336/Patterns_of_alcohol_consumption_smoking_and_illicit_drug_use_in_British_university_students:_interfaculty_comparisons_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(97)00083-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -