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Autoantibodies to oxidized low density lipoprotein: the relationship to low density lipoprotein fatty acid composition in diabetes.
Diabet Med. 1997 Sep; 14(9):741-7.DM

Abstract

Autoantibodies to oxidized low density lipoprotein have been shown to be an independent predictor of the progression of carotid atherosclerosis. This study examines the relationship between low density lipoprotein fatty acid composition and autoantibodies to both malondialdehyde-modified and copper-oxidized low density lipoprotein in non-diabetic patients with (n = 17), and without (n = 18), definite evidence of previous myocardial infarction. The third group were non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients with no evidence of atherosclerosis (n = 15) and the fourth group were patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes (n = 17) who had definite evidence of previous myocardial infarction. Fatty acids were measured by gas-liquid chromatography. Antibodies to malondialdehyde-modified low density lipoprotein and copper-oxidized low density lipoprotein were determined by an ELISA method. Autoantibodies to copper-oxidized low density lipoprotein were significantly higher in the non-diabetic patients with heart disease when compared to any other group (p < 0.05). Autoantibodies to malondialdehyde-modified low density lipoprotein were significantly higher in the non-diabetic subjects with heart disease and in both diabetic groups compared to non-diabetic subjects without coronary heart disease (p < 0.05). Linoleic acid (%) in low density lipoprotein did not differ between groups groups but arachidonic acid (%) was significantly lower in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients with coronary heart disease (p < 0.05). The diabetic patients with low antibodies had 39.6 +/- 2.2% polyunsaturated fatty acids in their low density lipoprotein while diabetic patients with high antibodies had 46.7 +/- 1.2% polyunsaturates in their low density lipoprotein (p < 0.01). This study confirms the association between antibodies to oxidized low density lipoprotein and coronary heart disease and shows raised low density lipoprotein antibody levels in diabetic patients with and without demonstrable atherosclerosis. In the diabetic patients, those with high antibody levels had high polyunsaturated fatty acid levels in their LDL suggesting a possible role for dietary intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Adelaide Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9300223

Citation

Griffin, M E., et al. "Autoantibodies to Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein: the Relationship to Low Density Lipoprotein Fatty Acid Composition in Diabetes." Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, vol. 14, no. 9, 1997, pp. 741-7.
Griffin ME, McInerney D, Fraser A, et al. Autoantibodies to oxidized low density lipoprotein: the relationship to low density lipoprotein fatty acid composition in diabetes. Diabet Med. 1997;14(9):741-7.
Griffin, M. E., McInerney, D., Fraser, A., Johnson, A. H., Collins, P. B., Owens, D., & Tomkin, G. H. (1997). Autoantibodies to oxidized low density lipoprotein: the relationship to low density lipoprotein fatty acid composition in diabetes. Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, 14(9), 741-7.
Griffin ME, et al. Autoantibodies to Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein: the Relationship to Low Density Lipoprotein Fatty Acid Composition in Diabetes. Diabet Med. 1997;14(9):741-7. PubMed PMID: 9300223.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Autoantibodies to oxidized low density lipoprotein: the relationship to low density lipoprotein fatty acid composition in diabetes. AU - Griffin,M E, AU - McInerney,D, AU - Fraser,A, AU - Johnson,A H, AU - Collins,P B, AU - Owens,D, AU - Tomkin,G H, PY - 1997/9/23/pubmed PY - 1997/9/23/medline PY - 1997/9/23/entrez SP - 741 EP - 7 JF - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association JO - Diabet Med VL - 14 IS - 9 N2 - Autoantibodies to oxidized low density lipoprotein have been shown to be an independent predictor of the progression of carotid atherosclerosis. This study examines the relationship between low density lipoprotein fatty acid composition and autoantibodies to both malondialdehyde-modified and copper-oxidized low density lipoprotein in non-diabetic patients with (n = 17), and without (n = 18), definite evidence of previous myocardial infarction. The third group were non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients with no evidence of atherosclerosis (n = 15) and the fourth group were patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes (n = 17) who had definite evidence of previous myocardial infarction. Fatty acids were measured by gas-liquid chromatography. Antibodies to malondialdehyde-modified low density lipoprotein and copper-oxidized low density lipoprotein were determined by an ELISA method. Autoantibodies to copper-oxidized low density lipoprotein were significantly higher in the non-diabetic patients with heart disease when compared to any other group (p < 0.05). Autoantibodies to malondialdehyde-modified low density lipoprotein were significantly higher in the non-diabetic subjects with heart disease and in both diabetic groups compared to non-diabetic subjects without coronary heart disease (p < 0.05). Linoleic acid (%) in low density lipoprotein did not differ between groups groups but arachidonic acid (%) was significantly lower in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients with coronary heart disease (p < 0.05). The diabetic patients with low antibodies had 39.6 +/- 2.2% polyunsaturated fatty acids in their low density lipoprotein while diabetic patients with high antibodies had 46.7 +/- 1.2% polyunsaturates in their low density lipoprotein (p < 0.01). This study confirms the association between antibodies to oxidized low density lipoprotein and coronary heart disease and shows raised low density lipoprotein antibody levels in diabetic patients with and without demonstrable atherosclerosis. In the diabetic patients, those with high antibody levels had high polyunsaturated fatty acid levels in their LDL suggesting a possible role for dietary intervention. SN - 0742-3071 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9300223/Autoantibodies_to_oxidized_low_density_lipoprotein:_the_relationship_to_low_density_lipoprotein_fatty_acid_composition_in_diabetes_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/2236 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -