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Elevated leptin concentrations in growth hormone-deficient hypopituitary adults.
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 1997; 47(2):153-9CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hypopituitarism with growth hormone (GH) deficiency is associated with obesity characterized by central (abdominal) distribution of fat. Recent work has demonstrated that leptin, a product of obese gene, is raised in obesity.

OBJECTIVE

To study circulating leptin levels in GH-deficient hypopituitary adults and to investigate its anthropometric, gender and metabolic relations.

METHODS

After an overnight fast of 10-12 hours, anthropometric parameters and body composition were measured and blood was collected for the measurement of circulating leptin, glucose, intact insulin, proinsulin, IGF-I, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.

SUBJECTS

Fifteen (7 men) GH-deficient hypopituitary adults (maximum stimulated serum GH to provocative testing < 6 mU/l) and 21 (10 men) normal control subjects matched for age, gender and body mass index (BMI).

RESULTS

Fasting serum leptin was significantly higher in hypopituitary patients than controls (12.0 +/- 1.8 vs 8.0 +/- 1.5 micrograms/l, P = 0.04). The increase was more marked in obese (BMI > 26.0 kg/m2) patients compared with obese controls (15.3 +/- 2.0 vs 8.8 +/- 2.3 micrograms/l, P = 0.03) than in lean patients and controls. Obese control women and men had higher leptin levels than non-obese (women, 16.6 +/- 2.7 vs 8.6 +/- 0.6 micrograms/l, P = 0.03; men, 4.9 +/- 0.5 vs 2.9 +/- 0.6 micrograms/l, P = 0.035). Similar changes were observed for obese versus non-obese patients, although the changes did not reach statistical significance. Women in each group had significantly higher leptin concentrations than men (patients: 15.5 +/- 2.3 vs 7.3 +/- 1.4 micrograms/l, P = 0.009; controls: 12.6 +/- 2.4 vs 4.3 +/- 0.5 micrograms/l, P = 0.0001). These gender differences remained significant even when expressed in relation to BMI (patients: 0.57 +/- 0.09 vs 0.26 +/- 0.05 ng.m2/ml.kg, P = 0.009; controls: 0.43 +/- 0.05 vs 0.16 +/- 0.02 ng.m2/ml.kg, P = 0.0001). Serum leptin was positively associated with body mass index (P = 0.003), percentage body fat mass (P = 0.0001) and inversely related with age (P = 0.043). It demonstrated no relation with body weight, waist circumference, waist to hip ratio, fasting IGF-I, glucose, insulin, proinsulin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL cholesterol in patients nor controls; 85% of variance in leptin was explained by a model including body mass index, gender, age and hypopituitarism.

CONCLUSIONS

Leptin concentrations are raised in GH-deficient hypopituitary adults to a greater extent than would be expected from the degree of obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit of Metabolic Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9302387

Citation

al-Shoumer, K A., et al. "Elevated Leptin Concentrations in Growth Hormone-deficient Hypopituitary Adults." Clinical Endocrinology, vol. 47, no. 2, 1997, pp. 153-9.
al-Shoumer KA, Anyaoku V, Richmond W, et al. Elevated leptin concentrations in growth hormone-deficient hypopituitary adults. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 1997;47(2):153-9.
al-Shoumer, K. A., Anyaoku, V., Richmond, W., & Johnston, D. G. (1997). Elevated leptin concentrations in growth hormone-deficient hypopituitary adults. Clinical Endocrinology, 47(2), pp. 153-9.
al-Shoumer KA, et al. Elevated Leptin Concentrations in Growth Hormone-deficient Hypopituitary Adults. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 1997;47(2):153-9. PubMed PMID: 9302387.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Elevated leptin concentrations in growth hormone-deficient hypopituitary adults. AU - al-Shoumer,K A, AU - Anyaoku,V, AU - Richmond,W, AU - Johnston,D G, PY - 1997/8/1/pubmed PY - 1997/9/26/medline PY - 1997/8/1/entrez SP - 153 EP - 9 JF - Clinical endocrinology JO - Clin. Endocrinol. (Oxf) VL - 47 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hypopituitarism with growth hormone (GH) deficiency is associated with obesity characterized by central (abdominal) distribution of fat. Recent work has demonstrated that leptin, a product of obese gene, is raised in obesity. OBJECTIVE: To study circulating leptin levels in GH-deficient hypopituitary adults and to investigate its anthropometric, gender and metabolic relations. METHODS: After an overnight fast of 10-12 hours, anthropometric parameters and body composition were measured and blood was collected for the measurement of circulating leptin, glucose, intact insulin, proinsulin, IGF-I, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. SUBJECTS: Fifteen (7 men) GH-deficient hypopituitary adults (maximum stimulated serum GH to provocative testing < 6 mU/l) and 21 (10 men) normal control subjects matched for age, gender and body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: Fasting serum leptin was significantly higher in hypopituitary patients than controls (12.0 +/- 1.8 vs 8.0 +/- 1.5 micrograms/l, P = 0.04). The increase was more marked in obese (BMI > 26.0 kg/m2) patients compared with obese controls (15.3 +/- 2.0 vs 8.8 +/- 2.3 micrograms/l, P = 0.03) than in lean patients and controls. Obese control women and men had higher leptin levels than non-obese (women, 16.6 +/- 2.7 vs 8.6 +/- 0.6 micrograms/l, P = 0.03; men, 4.9 +/- 0.5 vs 2.9 +/- 0.6 micrograms/l, P = 0.035). Similar changes were observed for obese versus non-obese patients, although the changes did not reach statistical significance. Women in each group had significantly higher leptin concentrations than men (patients: 15.5 +/- 2.3 vs 7.3 +/- 1.4 micrograms/l, P = 0.009; controls: 12.6 +/- 2.4 vs 4.3 +/- 0.5 micrograms/l, P = 0.0001). These gender differences remained significant even when expressed in relation to BMI (patients: 0.57 +/- 0.09 vs 0.26 +/- 0.05 ng.m2/ml.kg, P = 0.009; controls: 0.43 +/- 0.05 vs 0.16 +/- 0.02 ng.m2/ml.kg, P = 0.0001). Serum leptin was positively associated with body mass index (P = 0.003), percentage body fat mass (P = 0.0001) and inversely related with age (P = 0.043). It demonstrated no relation with body weight, waist circumference, waist to hip ratio, fasting IGF-I, glucose, insulin, proinsulin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL cholesterol in patients nor controls; 85% of variance in leptin was explained by a model including body mass index, gender, age and hypopituitarism. CONCLUSIONS: Leptin concentrations are raised in GH-deficient hypopituitary adults to a greater extent than would be expected from the degree of obesity. SN - 0300-0664 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9302387/Elevated_leptin_concentrations_in_growth_hormone_deficient_hypopituitary_adults_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0300-0664&amp;date=1997&amp;volume=47&amp;issue=2&amp;spage=153 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -