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Elevated leptin concentrations in growth hormone-deficient hypopituitary adults.
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 1997; 47(2):153-9CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hypopituitarism with growth hormone (GH) deficiency is associated with obesity characterized by central (abdominal) distribution of fat. Recent work has demonstrated that leptin, a product of obese gene, is raised in obesity.

OBJECTIVE

To study circulating leptin levels in GH-deficient hypopituitary adults and to investigate its anthropometric, gender and metabolic relations.

METHODS

After an overnight fast of 10-12 hours, anthropometric parameters and body composition were measured and blood was collected for the measurement of circulating leptin, glucose, intact insulin, proinsulin, IGF-I, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.

SUBJECTS

Fifteen (7 men) GH-deficient hypopituitary adults (maximum stimulated serum GH to provocative testing < 6 mU/l) and 21 (10 men) normal control subjects matched for age, gender and body mass index (BMI).

RESULTS

Fasting serum leptin was significantly higher in hypopituitary patients than controls (12.0 +/- 1.8 vs 8.0 +/- 1.5 micrograms/l, P = 0.04). The increase was more marked in obese (BMI > 26.0 kg/m2) patients compared with obese controls (15.3 +/- 2.0 vs 8.8 +/- 2.3 micrograms/l, P = 0.03) than in lean patients and controls. Obese control women and men had higher leptin levels than non-obese (women, 16.6 +/- 2.7 vs 8.6 +/- 0.6 micrograms/l, P = 0.03; men, 4.9 +/- 0.5 vs 2.9 +/- 0.6 micrograms/l, P = 0.035). Similar changes were observed for obese versus non-obese patients, although the changes did not reach statistical significance. Women in each group had significantly higher leptin concentrations than men (patients: 15.5 +/- 2.3 vs 7.3 +/- 1.4 micrograms/l, P = 0.009; controls: 12.6 +/- 2.4 vs 4.3 +/- 0.5 micrograms/l, P = 0.0001). These gender differences remained significant even when expressed in relation to BMI (patients: 0.57 +/- 0.09 vs 0.26 +/- 0.05 ng.m2/ml.kg, P = 0.009; controls: 0.43 +/- 0.05 vs 0.16 +/- 0.02 ng.m2/ml.kg, P = 0.0001). Serum leptin was positively associated with body mass index (P = 0.003), percentage body fat mass (P = 0.0001) and inversely related with age (P = 0.043). It demonstrated no relation with body weight, waist circumference, waist to hip ratio, fasting IGF-I, glucose, insulin, proinsulin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL cholesterol in patients nor controls; 85% of variance in leptin was explained by a model including body mass index, gender, age and hypopituitarism.

CONCLUSIONS

Leptin concentrations are raised in GH-deficient hypopituitary adults to a greater extent than would be expected from the degree of obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit of Metabolic Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9302387

Citation

al-Shoumer, K A., et al. "Elevated Leptin Concentrations in Growth Hormone-deficient Hypopituitary Adults." Clinical Endocrinology, vol. 47, no. 2, 1997, pp. 153-9.
al-Shoumer KA, Anyaoku V, Richmond W, et al. Elevated leptin concentrations in growth hormone-deficient hypopituitary adults. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 1997;47(2):153-9.
al-Shoumer, K. A., Anyaoku, V., Richmond, W., & Johnston, D. G. (1997). Elevated leptin concentrations in growth hormone-deficient hypopituitary adults. Clinical Endocrinology, 47(2), pp. 153-9.
al-Shoumer KA, et al. Elevated Leptin Concentrations in Growth Hormone-deficient Hypopituitary Adults. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 1997;47(2):153-9. PubMed PMID: 9302387.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Elevated leptin concentrations in growth hormone-deficient hypopituitary adults. AU - al-Shoumer,K A, AU - Anyaoku,V, AU - Richmond,W, AU - Johnston,D G, PY - 1997/8/1/pubmed PY - 1997/9/26/medline PY - 1997/8/1/entrez SP - 153 EP - 9 JF - Clinical endocrinology JO - Clin. Endocrinol. (Oxf) VL - 47 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hypopituitarism with growth hormone (GH) deficiency is associated with obesity characterized by central (abdominal) distribution of fat. Recent work has demonstrated that leptin, a product of obese gene, is raised in obesity. OBJECTIVE: To study circulating leptin levels in GH-deficient hypopituitary adults and to investigate its anthropometric, gender and metabolic relations. METHODS: After an overnight fast of 10-12 hours, anthropometric parameters and body composition were measured and blood was collected for the measurement of circulating leptin, glucose, intact insulin, proinsulin, IGF-I, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. SUBJECTS: Fifteen (7 men) GH-deficient hypopituitary adults (maximum stimulated serum GH to provocative testing < 6 mU/l) and 21 (10 men) normal control subjects matched for age, gender and body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: Fasting serum leptin was significantly higher in hypopituitary patients than controls (12.0 +/- 1.8 vs 8.0 +/- 1.5 micrograms/l, P = 0.04). The increase was more marked in obese (BMI > 26.0 kg/m2) patients compared with obese controls (15.3 +/- 2.0 vs 8.8 +/- 2.3 micrograms/l, P = 0.03) than in lean patients and controls. Obese control women and men had higher leptin levels than non-obese (women, 16.6 +/- 2.7 vs 8.6 +/- 0.6 micrograms/l, P = 0.03; men, 4.9 +/- 0.5 vs 2.9 +/- 0.6 micrograms/l, P = 0.035). Similar changes were observed for obese versus non-obese patients, although the changes did not reach statistical significance. Women in each group had significantly higher leptin concentrations than men (patients: 15.5 +/- 2.3 vs 7.3 +/- 1.4 micrograms/l, P = 0.009; controls: 12.6 +/- 2.4 vs 4.3 +/- 0.5 micrograms/l, P = 0.0001). These gender differences remained significant even when expressed in relation to BMI (patients: 0.57 +/- 0.09 vs 0.26 +/- 0.05 ng.m2/ml.kg, P = 0.009; controls: 0.43 +/- 0.05 vs 0.16 +/- 0.02 ng.m2/ml.kg, P = 0.0001). Serum leptin was positively associated with body mass index (P = 0.003), percentage body fat mass (P = 0.0001) and inversely related with age (P = 0.043). It demonstrated no relation with body weight, waist circumference, waist to hip ratio, fasting IGF-I, glucose, insulin, proinsulin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL cholesterol in patients nor controls; 85% of variance in leptin was explained by a model including body mass index, gender, age and hypopituitarism. CONCLUSIONS: Leptin concentrations are raised in GH-deficient hypopituitary adults to a greater extent than would be expected from the degree of obesity. SN - 0300-0664 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9302387/Elevated_leptin_concentrations_in_growth_hormone_deficient_hypopituitary_adults_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0300-0664&amp;date=1997&amp;volume=47&amp;issue=2&amp;spage=153 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -