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Screening patients with celiac disease for primary biliary cirrhosis and vice versa.
Am J Gastroenterol. 1997 Sep; 92(9):1524-6.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

An association between celiac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis has been reported in a few cases, mainly as individual case reports.

OBJECTIVES

To screen adult patients with celiac disease for primary biliary cirrhosis and patients with primary biliary cirrhosis for intestinal celiac involvement.

METHODS

The celiac group consisted of 336 adults (218 women and 118 men; mean age, 36 yr; range 18-74 yr) with celiac disease diagnosed by serological and histological tests, 38 with newly diagnosed celiac disease and 298 with previously diagnosed celiac disease who were consuming a gluten-free diet. The mean follow-up period was 6 yr (range, 1-16 yr). Liver function parameters and autoantibody levels were determined, and, when indicated, histological tests were performed. The biliary cirrhosis group consisted of 65 subjects (58 women and seven men) (mean age, 59 yr; range, 35-67 yr) with primary biliary cirrhosis diagnosed 1-17 years previously (mean, 7 yr) on the basis of the usual biochemical, serological, and histological criteria. Antigliadin and antiendomysium antibody levels were determined, and two biopsy specimens from the distal duodenum obtained during endoscopy were evaluated.

RESULTS

In patients with celiac disease, impairment of liver function was frequently found at diagnosis (16 of 38, or 44%), but primary biliary cirrhosis was diagnosed in only one case. In patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, no cases of celiac disease, as currently defined, were found.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings indicate that celiac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis are rarely associated and support the hypothesis that the intestinal lesions per se are not responsible for the liver disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cattedra di Gastroenterologia, Istituto di Scienze Mediche, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore, Università di Milano, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9317077

Citation

Bardella, M T., et al. "Screening Patients With Celiac Disease for Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Vice Versa." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 92, no. 9, 1997, pp. 1524-6.
Bardella MT, Quatrini M, Zuin M, et al. Screening patients with celiac disease for primary biliary cirrhosis and vice versa. Am J Gastroenterol. 1997;92(9):1524-6.
Bardella, M. T., Quatrini, M., Zuin, M., Podda, M., Cesarini, L., Velio, P., Bianchi, P., & Conte, D. (1997). Screening patients with celiac disease for primary biliary cirrhosis and vice versa. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 92(9), 1524-6.
Bardella MT, et al. Screening Patients With Celiac Disease for Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Vice Versa. Am J Gastroenterol. 1997;92(9):1524-6. PubMed PMID: 9317077.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Screening patients with celiac disease for primary biliary cirrhosis and vice versa. AU - Bardella,M T, AU - Quatrini,M, AU - Zuin,M, AU - Podda,M, AU - Cesarini,L, AU - Velio,P, AU - Bianchi,P, AU - Conte,D, PY - 1997/10/8/pubmed PY - 1997/10/8/medline PY - 1997/10/8/entrez SP - 1524 EP - 6 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 92 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: An association between celiac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis has been reported in a few cases, mainly as individual case reports. OBJECTIVES: To screen adult patients with celiac disease for primary biliary cirrhosis and patients with primary biliary cirrhosis for intestinal celiac involvement. METHODS: The celiac group consisted of 336 adults (218 women and 118 men; mean age, 36 yr; range 18-74 yr) with celiac disease diagnosed by serological and histological tests, 38 with newly diagnosed celiac disease and 298 with previously diagnosed celiac disease who were consuming a gluten-free diet. The mean follow-up period was 6 yr (range, 1-16 yr). Liver function parameters and autoantibody levels were determined, and, when indicated, histological tests were performed. The biliary cirrhosis group consisted of 65 subjects (58 women and seven men) (mean age, 59 yr; range, 35-67 yr) with primary biliary cirrhosis diagnosed 1-17 years previously (mean, 7 yr) on the basis of the usual biochemical, serological, and histological criteria. Antigliadin and antiendomysium antibody levels were determined, and two biopsy specimens from the distal duodenum obtained during endoscopy were evaluated. RESULTS: In patients with celiac disease, impairment of liver function was frequently found at diagnosis (16 of 38, or 44%), but primary biliary cirrhosis was diagnosed in only one case. In patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, no cases of celiac disease, as currently defined, were found. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that celiac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis are rarely associated and support the hypothesis that the intestinal lesions per se are not responsible for the liver disease. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9317077/Screening_patients_with_celiac_disease_for_primary_biliary_cirrhosis_and_vice_versa_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/5940 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -