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Sural/radial amplitude ratio in the diagnosis of mild axonal polyneuropathy.
Muscle Nerve. 1997 Oct; 20(10):1236-41.MN

Abstract

As proximal nerves are relatively spared in length-dependent, axonal polyneuropathy, we theorized that a sural/radial amplitude ratio (SRAR) might be a sensitive indicator of mild polyneuropathy. In this study, sural amplitudes and SRARs in patients with signs of mild axonal polyneuropathy were compared to those of normal, age-matched control subjects. Sural and radial sensory responses were measured in a standard fashion in all subjects. Thirty polyneuropathy patients had an average SRAR of 0.29 as compared to 0.71 for the 30 normal subjects. An SRAR of less than 0.40 was a strong predictor of axonal polyneuropathy, with 90% sensitivity and 90% specificity, as compared to an absolute sural amplitude of less than 6.0 microV, which had sensitivity of only 66%. Additionally, unlike the sural amplitude, the ratio did not vary significantly with age. We conclude that the SRAR is a sensitive, specific, age-independent electrodiagnostic test for mild axonal polyneuropathy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

9324079

Citation

Rutkove, S B., et al. "Sural/radial Amplitude Ratio in the Diagnosis of Mild Axonal Polyneuropathy." Muscle & Nerve, vol. 20, no. 10, 1997, pp. 1236-41.
Rutkove SB, Kothari MJ, Raynor EM, et al. Sural/radial amplitude ratio in the diagnosis of mild axonal polyneuropathy. Muscle Nerve. 1997;20(10):1236-41.
Rutkove, S. B., Kothari, M. J., Raynor, E. M., Levy, M. L., Fadic, R., & Nardin, R. A. (1997). Sural/radial amplitude ratio in the diagnosis of mild axonal polyneuropathy. Muscle & Nerve, 20(10), 1236-41.
Rutkove SB, et al. Sural/radial Amplitude Ratio in the Diagnosis of Mild Axonal Polyneuropathy. Muscle Nerve. 1997;20(10):1236-41. PubMed PMID: 9324079.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sural/radial amplitude ratio in the diagnosis of mild axonal polyneuropathy. AU - Rutkove,S B, AU - Kothari,M J, AU - Raynor,E M, AU - Levy,M L, AU - Fadic,R, AU - Nardin,R A, PY - 1997/10/27/pubmed PY - 2000/6/20/medline PY - 1997/10/27/entrez SP - 1236 EP - 41 JF - Muscle & nerve JO - Muscle Nerve VL - 20 IS - 10 N2 - As proximal nerves are relatively spared in length-dependent, axonal polyneuropathy, we theorized that a sural/radial amplitude ratio (SRAR) might be a sensitive indicator of mild polyneuropathy. In this study, sural amplitudes and SRARs in patients with signs of mild axonal polyneuropathy were compared to those of normal, age-matched control subjects. Sural and radial sensory responses were measured in a standard fashion in all subjects. Thirty polyneuropathy patients had an average SRAR of 0.29 as compared to 0.71 for the 30 normal subjects. An SRAR of less than 0.40 was a strong predictor of axonal polyneuropathy, with 90% sensitivity and 90% specificity, as compared to an absolute sural amplitude of less than 6.0 microV, which had sensitivity of only 66%. Additionally, unlike the sural amplitude, the ratio did not vary significantly with age. We conclude that the SRAR is a sensitive, specific, age-independent electrodiagnostic test for mild axonal polyneuropathy. SN - 0148-639X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/9324079/Sural/radial_amplitude_ratio_in_the_diagnosis_of_mild_axonal_polyneuropathy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/(sici)1097-4598(199710)20:10<1236::aid-mus5>3.0.co;2-d DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -